Archives par mot-clé : romance

CFP: Journal of Popular Romance Studies, Georgette Heyer Special Issue (Deadline 1 oct.)



Journal of Popular Romance Studies

Georgette Heyer Special Issue

Deadline Extended 10/1/2013

The Journal of Popular Romance Studies is soliciting papers for a special forum on Heyer as a romance novelist, guest-edited by Phyllis M. Betz. Papers may focus on individual novels or groups of texts, on Heyer’s changing status as a middlebrow and popular novelist, on paratextual and contextual issues (covers and marketing, publication history, reception), or on Heyer’s legacy. All theoretical approaches are welcome. The deadline for submissions is October 1, 2012; the issue is slated for publication in April, 2013.

Essays / proposals on Heyer’s work in other genres, and on her genre-crossing texts, are also solicited for a separate anthology, also edited by Phyllis M. Betz.

Published by the International Association for the Study of Popular Romance (IASPR), the peer-reviewed Journal of Popular Romance Studies is the first academic journal to focus exclusively on representations of romantic love across national and disciplinary boundaries. JPRS is available without subscription at http://jprstudies.org.

For the special JPRS forum on Heyer as a romance novelist, please submit scholarly papers to An Goris, Managing Editor managing.editor@jprstudies.org and betz@lasalle.edu. Submissions should be Microsoft Word documents of no more than 10,000 words,, with citations in MLA format. To facilitate blind peer review, please remove your name and other identifying information from the manuscript. Feel free to suggest appropriate peer reviewers.

For more information about the anthology on Heyer’s work in other genres, please contact Phyllis M. Betz directly at betz@lasalle.edu.

CFP: Edited Collection: Challenger Unbound (Revaluating Arthur Conan Doyle’s Professor Challenger Narratives)



Edited Collection: Challenger Unbound

(Revaluating Arthur Conan Doyle’s Professor Challenger Narratives)

Habitually characterised as a late-appearing variant upon the Victorian Quest Romance, Arthur Conan Doyle’s “The Lost World” (1912) in fact marked the beginning of the author’s prolonged investigation of science, ideology and belief under the inhibiting constraints of early twentieth-century modernity. The narratives span from 1912 to 1929 and this new collection will be dedicated to re-evaluating the narratives, their author, the wider culture that he inhabited and the legacy of his work for the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We are interested in work that treats the texts either directly or tangentially through other aspects of Conan Doyle’s life and thought.

The editors would like to solicit abstracts of 200-300 words or completed articles of 6,000-12,000 words. We are interested in covering as many divergent approaches to the narratives as possible but potential topics might include:

• The Twentieth-Century Quest Romance.
• Arthur Conan Doyle: Low Modernist.
• Arthur Conan Doyle’s Contribution to Science-Fiction and/or Speculative Fiction
• Modernity and the State in Early Twentieth-Century Popular Fiction.
• Science and the Popular Press, 1912-1930.
• Science as a Public Discourse, 1912-1930.
• Science as State-Craft, 1912-1930.
• Spiritual vs. Material Science.
• Grief, Trauma, Mourning and Science during and after the Great War.
• Twentieth-Century Medievalism/Primitivism.
• Spiritualism, Science and the Great War.
• The Strand Magazine in the Twentieth-Century.
• The Twentieth-Century Afterlife of “Victorian” Ideology/Thought/Literary Forms.
• Weapons of Mass Destruction, 1912-1930.
• Heroism, Chivalry and Masculinity after the Great War.
• Science, Technology and European Competition, 1912-1930.
• The Twentieth-Century Legacy of Arthur Conan Doyle in Europe.
• Machines, Weapons, Products, Commodities.
• Conan Doyle’s Non-Fiction, 1912-1930.
• The Endurance of Professor Challenger in Critical Theory (Deleuze & Guattari, Jon McKenzie etc…).
• Early Treatments of Capitalist/Communist Confrontations in Popular Fiction.

Abstracts, submissions and questions should be sent to Dr. Jonathan Cranfield (j.cranfield@kent.ac.uk) and Prof. Hélène Machinal (helene.machinal@univ-brest.fr)

CFP: Popular Romance (30 avril 2012)

Call for Papers: Popular Romance


2012 Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Conference
Friday-Sunday, October 12-14, 2012
Columbus, OH
Renaissance Columbus Downtown Hotel
(Conference info: http://www.mpcaaca.org)

Deadline for submission: April 30, 2012.

The most prevalent narrative structure of popular romance is an integral element of any story, regardless of forum: film, television, fiction, manga, advertising. Not only is romance exceptionally popular, it is so pervasive as to become ordinary and overlooked. As the popularity of romance increases, so too does the need for serious scholarship of the genre in all its incarnations. We are interested in any and all topics about or related to popular romance and its representations in popular culture (fiction, stage, screen—large or small, commercial, advertising, music, song, dance, online, real life, etc.)

Proposals may be for individual papers or 3-person panels.

Topics can include, but are not limited to:
• critical approaches, such as readings informed by critical race theory, queer theory, postcolonial studies, or empirical science
• depictions in the media and popular culture (e.g., film, television, literature, comics)
• literature and fiction (genre romance, poetry, animé)
• types of relationships (marriage, gay and lesbian)
• historical practices and traditions of and in romance
• regional and geographic pressures and influences (southern, Caribbean)
• material culture (valentines, foods, fashions)
• folklore and mythologies
• jokes and humor
• romantic love in political discourse (capitalism)
• psychological approaches toward romantic attraction
• emotional and sexual desire
• subcultures: age (seniors, adolescents), multi-ethnic, inter-racial
• individual creative producers or texts of popular romance
• gender-bending and gender-crossing

Submit a one-page (200-250 words) proposal or abstract by 30 April 2012 to Maryan Wherry, Popular Romance, http://submissions.mpcaaca.org. Please include name, affiliation, and e-mail address with your abstract. Also, please indicate in your submission whether your presentation will require a TV and DVD player. Note that LCD projectors will not be provided by MPCA/ACA.
More conference information can be found at http://www.mpcaaca.org/.
For further inquiries or concerns, please contact Romance Area Chair, Maryan Wherry, Black Hawk College, wherrym@bhc.edu.