Archives par mot-clé : jeux vidéo

Appel à communications : Journée d’étude “Gēmu : qu’est-ce qu’un jeu vidéo “japonais” ?” (Université Jean Moulin – Lyon 3)

Journée d’étude Gēmu : qu’est-ce qu’un jeu vidéo “japonais” ?”

11 mai 2023

Lyon

Échéance des propositions : 15 décembre 2022

Organisé par Julien Bouvard (IETT, Université Jean Moulin – Lyon 3) et Grégoire Sastre (CRJ-Ehess, Université Cergy Paris)

Appel à communications

Depuis les années 1970, le Japon tient une place majeure dans la production vidéoludique mondiale. Tout le monde connaît les noms de Nintendo, Sega, Taito, Namco et plus récemment Sony, acteurs d’un vaste marché qui commence dans le jeu d’arcade et s’étend aujourd’hui jusqu’au jeu mobile. Leur incontestable succès international a largement contribué à associer le pays à ces objets vidéoludiques, au point que le Japon a longtemps été perçu comme un eldorado du jeu vidéo, en avance sur le reste du monde. Paradoxalement, c’est au moment où le Japon entrait dans une période de récession économique – l’ère Heisei 1989-2019 – que sa culture populaire, dont la production vidéoludique, devenait l’un des emblèmes contemporains du pays, ce qui a nourri quelques espoirs en matière de Soft Power dans les années 2000 (Iwabuchi 2002). Continuer la lecture de Appel à communications : Journée d’étude “Gēmu : qu’est-ce qu’un jeu vidéo “japonais” ?” (Université Jean Moulin – Lyon 3)

Call for papers : International conference “Games & Literature – On the literaricity, research, collection, and archiving of computer games” (German Literature Archive Marbach)

International interdisciplinary conference “Games & Literature. On the literaricity, research, collection, and archiving of computer games”

28–30 June 2023

German Literature Archive Marbach (DLA)

Deadline for proposals : January 31, 2023

Organized by Birgit Wollgarten and Marie Limbourg

In cooperation with: European Federation of Game Archives, Museums and Preservation Projects (EFGAMP e.V.), DIGAREC – Digital Games Research Center of the University of Potsdam, the Computer Games Museum Berlin, and the Foundation for Digital Games Culture

Call for papers

DLA Marbach and Computer Games

In addition to collecting literature in its commonly understood forms, the German Literature Archive Marbach (DLA) also archives and collects computer games as a medial form of literature. The aim of the DLA in doing so is to engage with literature in all its mediality. The substantive reasons for this decision are numerous, but, fundamentally, computer games have long been part of our cultural memory, which must be archived appropriately and examined in relation to established cultural forms. The fact that computer games are discussed in the feature pages of the major daily newspapers, that the German Federal Government awards the German Computer Game Prize, and that computer games are officially recognized as a cultural asset by the Cultural Council is due, among other things, to the work of museums such as the New York Museum of Modern Arts, the Computer Game Museum Berlin, and the Karlsruhe Centre for Art and Media (ZKM).

As an archive for literature, the DLA has been dealing with hybrid forms of literature for some years now, for literature is not only created and produced between two book covers, but also on the computer, as “born-digital” literature. Within the framework of the “Netzliteratur” project (2013–2017), the DLA has done pioneering work on the systematic analysis and documentation of the creation, playback, performance and mirroring environment of games in line with defined standards. This work is being continued in various projects at the DLA, but a larger international, interdisciplinary conference is needed to further discuss and advance these endeavours with regard to questions of collection and archiving as well as research. To this end, we invite literary scholars, archivists, librarians, as well as researchers in Games Studies, Media and Communication Studies, and game designers to Marbach.

The “literaricity” of computer games and the collection mandate of a literature archive

The planned conference will encompass various aspects of researching literature and computer games, as well as collecting, archiving, and exhibiting them.

Although the intersections, as well as the differences, between literature and computer games have frequently been addressed in the last two to three decades, a systemization of these approaches and a research-led development of a catalogue of criteria for a kind of “literacity” of computer games have only rarely been attempted. Thus, one of the questions to be asked in the context of this conference is which relevance criteria are to be given special consideration in a computer game collection in a literature archive. For just as not every book is relevant to the collection mandate of the DLA, not every computer game will be included in the collection. For this special collection in the DLA, an interdisciplinary research discussion is still needed to define collection criteria. First significant selection criteria – which are, however, yet to be discussed further – are, for example, the special handling of text and language in a game, in a broader sense than simply through literary objects (such as diaries, manuscripts, libraries, etc.) in the game. Furthermore, we do not wish to ask (as has become the practice in Game Studies) whether computer games are narrative, but rather in what way they are so. In addition to adaptations of literary works, games with reception traces that can be linked to authors and literary works certainly belong in a literature archive.

Subsequently, the criteria according to which computer games are classified must be clarified, as must the metadata used to list them in the library catalogue. A further challenge is the selection of the accompanying material that is to be archived alongside the game to which it is connected. Possibly there is a game developer’s private library, equivalent to an author’s private library, that needs to be consulted by researchers. And what forms of reception of computer games should the archive and library at the DLA take into account? Numerous activities of gaming culture seem relevant here, for example the staging of a computer game in a Let’s Play; the players and their interaction with and reception of computer games must, with greater urgency, become the subject of research and archives. But even the digital archive has its limits – the goal is never the ‘total archive’ – yet it remains to be determined how social media, for example, is to be collected and archived.

The analysis instruments

But what definition of text can we use, as a literature archive, with which to approach computer games? The media shift in literature not only calls the concept of text and literature into question, it also repeatedly demands that analytical methods and instruments be expanded and revised. How can computer games be adequately described in such contexts? It is often not enough simply to ‘apply’ established literary terms to computer games – when the aim is to describe computer games in their status as literary forms. These considerations are preceded by the question of what the specific literary narrative of computer games looks like.

The technologies of archiving and accessibility

In addition to these questions of content, the technical preservation of games and archiving strategies also currently pose challenges. For example, how do we deal with obsolete hardware and software? How can the interaction with recipients, players, be guaranteed at a technical and a curatorial level? How can and should computer games be stored for research in the long term? And finally, institutions are faced with various legal problems: For example, which licences for software and operating systems are to be obtained?

Key topics

We invite researchers at all career stages to submit contributions. Based on the key topics outlined above, contributions in the following areas are of particular interest:

  1. Before computer games: Playful and medial forms of literaricity / grey areas of narration
  2. Media shift: Book and game
  3. Storytelling – Text – Code. Narrative techniques in computer games
  4. Describing, researching, and exhibiting computer games as an aesthetic experience
  5. Collecting and archiving software objects

We are pleased to welcome our keynote speakers Espen Aarseth, Réne Bauer, Astrid Ensslin and Beat Suter. In addition, Lena Falkenhagen will moderate the Game Culture Quartet (organized by the Foundation for Digital Games Culture) at the DLA Marbach.

Short abstracts (300 words in German or English) for 30-minute papers should be submitted together with a brief CV and a selected publications list by 31 January 2023.

● Please submit your abstract and CV by uploading them to this portal.

● The conference will be conducted in English.

● Accommodation and travel costs will be reimbursed.

Concept

Dîlan Canan Çakir – Research Associate MWW – German Literature Archive Marbach

Anna Kinder – Head of Research – German Literature Archive Marbach

Continuer la lecture de Call for papers : International conference “Games & Literature – On the literaricity, research, collection, and archiving of computer games” (German Literature Archive Marbach)

Parution : Dictionnaire du Moyen Âge imaginaire. Le médiévalisme, hier et aujourd’hui (dir. A. Besson, W. Blanc et V. Ferré)

Anne Besson, William Blanc et Vincent Ferré (dir.), Dictionnaire du Moyen Âge imaginaire. Le médiévalisme, hier et aujourd’hui, Vendémiaire, 2022. 

Gentes dames et preux chevaliers, gueux et sorcières, moines rubiconds et inquisiteurs fanatiques, mais aussi Robin des Bois, Jeanne d’Arc, Gengis Khan, Saladin, Mélusine, le roi Arthur…

Le Moyen Âge est bien plus qu’une période historique : c’est un livre d’images foisonnant où artistes, créateurs et cultures populaires n’ont eu de cesse de puiser, réinventant inlassablement selon leur goût et celui de leur temps enluminures, donjons et cathédrales.

Rassemblant les meilleurs chercheurs sur le sujet, ce dictionnaire, premier du genre, décrypte en plus de 120 entrées cette recréation d’un Moyen Âge fantasmé qu’on désigne sous le nom de « médiévalisme », de Walter Scott à Umberto Eco, de l’Allemagne au Japon en passant par la Turquie et l’Afrique, des romans historiques aux films et séries de fantasy, sans oublier les jeux vidéo, les jeux de rôle, la bande dessinée, la peinture, les fêtes médiévales, la musique et la poésie…

Un bréviaire indispensable pour explorer les mille métamorphoses de ce temps lointain qui obsède notre imaginaire contemporain.

Cet ouvrage réunit 72 contributeurs et contributrices sous la direction d’Anne Besson, directrice du Dictionnaire de la fantasy (Vendémiaire, 2018), William Blanc, auteur du Roi Arthur, un mythe contemporain (Libertalia, 2016) et de Vincent Ferré, directeur du volume Médiévalisme. Modernité du Moyen Âge (2010).

Continuer la lecture de Parution : Dictionnaire du Moyen Âge imaginaire. Le médiévalisme, hier et aujourd’hui (dir. A. Besson, W. Blanc et V. Ferré)

Call for papers: Second International Conference of Video Game Studies: “Video Games as a Challenge to Academia – 50 Years of the Gaming Industry” (Novi Sad, Serbia)

Second International Conference of Video Game Studies: “Video Games as a Challenge to Academia – 50 Years of the Gaming Industry”

December 10th-11th 2022

Novi Sad, Serbia

Deadline for proposals: October 10th, 2022

Organized by the University of Novi Sad, Academy of Arts, the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philology, and the Serbian Games Association (SGA)

Call for papers

Exactly fifty years ago, in 1972, Magnavox came out with the first home gaming console, designed by Ralph Baer. That same year, Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney founded Atari, the first game development company. Atari achieved immense success with Pong, a game that inspired many to try their luck at the game development business, first in the US, then in Japan and Europe, and finally across the globe. These events mark the birth of the largest media industry in existence today. In honour of this anniversary, the Academy of Arts in Novi Sad, in cooperation with the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philology, and the Serbian Games Association (SGA), are organising the second international conference dedicated to the study of video games in Serbia, Video Games as a Challenge to Academia: 50 Years of the Gaming Industry.

Continuer la lecture de Call for papers: Second International Conference of Video Game Studies: “Video Games as a Challenge to Academia – 50 Years of the Gaming Industry” (Novi Sad, Serbia)

Enzo Le Guiriec (Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3)

Formation

  • Depuis septembre 2020 Doctorat études japonaises – Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3
    « Rythme ou geste ? Morphologies du corps dans le dungeon-crawler  japonais entre 1992 et 2006 »
  • 2018-2020 Master Études japonaises – Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3
    « Corps et mouvements dans le jeu vidéo japonais 3D : King’s Field
    (1994) et la transformation »
  • 2015-2018 Licence en Langues et Cultures Étrangères et Régionales-Japonais – Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3
  • 2014-2015 Baccalauréat section littéraire, Spécialisation Arts Plastiques

Expérience professionnelle

  • Depuis janvier 2021 Enseignant vacataire section japonais – Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3
  • Depuis septembre 2020 Soutien scolaire langues vivantes et philosophie – Acadomia

Appel à contributions: Colloque “Le genre et la sexualité dans le jeu : jeux de rôles, imaginaires et possibles” (Université de Strasbourg)

Colloque “Le genre et la sexualité dans le jeu : jeux de rôles, imaginaires et possibles”

8 et 9 décembre 2022

Université de Strasbourg

Organisé par Laurence Schmoll, Valentine Royaux et Kim-Marlène Le – Université de Strasbourg 

Appel à contributions

Les années 2010 ont été marquées par des mouvements qui mettent en lumière le sexisme dans les industries culturelles et, plus généralement, dans la société, en témoignent  #GamerGate (2014) et #MeToo (2017). Depuis, le genre et la sexualité sont des sujets abordés de manière beaucoup plus frontale et explicite, attirant de plus en plus l‘attention du grand public. Dans le domaine vidéoludique, la question du genre atteint actuellement un niveau d’intérêt élevé, et ce, par le biais de trois prismes. Continuer la lecture de Appel à contributions: Colloque “Le genre et la sexualité dans le jeu : jeux de rôles, imaginaires et possibles” (Université de Strasbourg)

CFP: History of Games conference 2022 (online)

History of Games conference 2022

End of October 2022

Online

Deadline for submissions: July 31st, 2022

Conference chairs: Yannick Rochat (Université de Lausanne) and Carl Therrien (Université de Montréal)

Call for participants and committee members

The history of games international conference series is a global initiative that seeks to act as a catalyst for academic research on gaming history. Biennial events bring together historians, curators, social scientists and archivists from academic or fan communities to develop networks and disseminate research and preservation initiatives.

Following the last conference held virtually in 2020, the next event will feature three main activities: keynote addresses by Wendi Sierra, Alexis Blanchet and Véronique Dasen; workshops focussing on emerging research; and a general meeting to elect members from all over the globe. All events will be completely free, hosted on Zoom and Discord towards the end of October 2022.

Since the pandemic has prevented many emerging scholars from travelling to conferences and getting feedback from their peers, this coming event will focus on providing discussion opportunities. We invite any researcher with an interest in the history of games to send short proposals (80-120 words) presenting their current research interests or an idea they would like to explore. We will assemble workshops by regrouping similar proposals and asking relevant experts from our network to join the conversation. These workshops will be held privately on Zoom, adjusting to each group’s preferences and time zones. We seek to accept as many short proposals as possible and assemble the program from there. We also accept applications to act as respondent.

In this context, we invite YOU to define the relevant topics that will help develop our understanding of game histories, including material and cultural inspections of sports, tabletop games and videogames. The steering committee of the conference series gives a good sense of the scope of experts we seek to bring into these conversations: https://www.history-of-games.com/steering-commitee/ 

The event will also feature keynote addresses by:

  • Wendi Sierra, author of Todd Howard. Worldbuilding in Tamriel and Beyond. Prof. Sierra will address the legacy of The Elder Scrolls 3: Morrowind, released 20 years ago.
  • Alexis Blanchet, author of Une histoire du jeu vidéo en France: 1960 – 1991. Dr. Blanchet will revisit the first occurrences of games in France, in universities, in arcades, and how an industry developed from there.
  • Véronique Dasen, author of several books and project lead of the ERC-funded project Locus ludi. Prof. Dasen will discuss this project, aimed at studying « the cultural fabric of play and games in Classical Antiquity ».

Please send your short proposals to yannick.rochat@unil.ch and carl.therrien@gmail.com by July 31st, 2022. Notifications of acceptance and workshop program will be communicated in September 2022.

Appel à communications : Colloque international – Fiction et patrimoine : le jeu comme lieu de mémoire (Metz)

Colloque international : “Fiction et patrimoine : le jeu comme lieu de mémoire

17 et 18 novembre 2022

Île du Saulcy, Metz (57000)

Échéance des propositions : 15 juillet 2022 

Organisé par Lucas Friche, Enora Gabory, Mathilde Gourrat, Sébastien Genvo, Jenguiz Kanaani, Victor Meunier, Pierre Morelli

Texte de l’appel

À l’occasion de la nomination d’Esch-sur-Alzette deuxième ville du Luxembourg, l’Institut National de l’Audiovisuel (INA), la Direction régionale des Affaires culturelles du Grand Est (Drac) et le Centre de recherche sur les médiations (Crem) s’associent autour du projet Memories, Images & History Across Borders (Mihab) relatif au patrimoine historique et culturel de la région transfrontalière de l’Alzette.

Ce projet de colloque s’inscrit dans ce partenariat et pose la question de la transmission de la mémoire, en particulier lorsque cette mémoire est attachée à un territoire particulier, comme l’est le territoire transfrontalier de l’Alzette. Continuer la lecture de Appel à communications : Colloque international – Fiction et patrimoine : le jeu comme lieu de mémoire (Metz)

Journée d’étude: “La frontière vidéoludique : ce que le jeu vidéo fait au réel” (ERIAC, Université de Rouen)

Journée d’étude: “La frontière vidéoludique : ce que le jeu vidéo fait au réel”

9 juin 2022

Maison de l’Université | Salle de conférence | Mont-Saint-Aignan & Visioconférence

Organisé par Franck Varenne et Martin Buthaud

Présentation

Les expressions de « monde réel » ou de « réel », dans le champ des sciences du jeu, semblent impliquer une forte dichotomie entre plusieurs territoires qui s’excluraient mutuellement, alors que de nombreuses études ont montré que certaines dynamiques sociales, culturelles, idéologiques ou économiques étaient « importées » de nos sociétés dans les jeux vidéo et remettent ainsi en cause l’idée d’une étanchéité entre le réel et le jeu. Notre journée d’étude, intitulée « La frontière vidéoludique : ce que le jeu vidéo fait au réel », propose dès lors d’interroger la nature de cette frontière vidéoludique avec le réel, d’en préciser les contours et d’en questionner la pertinence. Nous porterons en particulier notre regard sur les incursions, importations et autres prescriptions d’origine extraterritoriale, à savoir sur les effets de la pratique vidéoludique sur le réel. Car comme pour n’importe quelle frontière, l’enjeu consiste notamment à se demander où se situent les points de passages, quelles sont les dynamiques transfrontalières, ce qui y transitent, sous quelles formes, et comment les territoires qu’elle sépare supposément interagissent en ce sens les uns avec les autres. De tels « effets » sont multiples et de natures différentes, de sorte qu’il demeure difficile de concevoir concrètement dans quelle mesure la pratique vidéoludique affecte le monde réel, nous-mêmes et notre rapport aux autres. Faut-il parler comme Schmoll (2010) d’une « contamination » de la réalité par le jeu ou d’un phénomène de « contagion » grâce aux processus de « ludicisation » (Genvo, 2013) qui émergeraient à partir d’une prétendue « confusion » entre le réel et le virtuel (Radillo & Virole, 2010) ? Que regroupent exactement de telles notions, et que disent-elles de notre rapport au réel par la médiation des jeux vidéo ? Dans quelle mesure les jeux vidéo ont-ils des effets sur notre compréhension ou nos représentations du monde réel, voire ont-ils le pouvoir de le transformer (McGonigal, 2012) ? Continuer la lecture de Journée d’étude: “La frontière vidéoludique : ce que le jeu vidéo fait au réel” (ERIAC, Université de Rouen)

CFP: The Futures of Games and Game Studies (Eludamos, special issue)

“The Futures of Games and Game Studies”

Eludamos, special issue

Full paper submission deadline: September 1, 2022

Publication: December 2022/January 2023

Call for papers

The theme of the special issue is the Futures of Games and Game Studies.

During its around 20 years of existence, game studies has put computer games on the academic map. The field has provided a response to effect studies by demonstrating that games are social arenas of intrinsic value to the individuals that use them, and that they are cultural products able to comment on society in new ways. From a more practical perspective, technical oriented game studies has driven developments in artificial intelligence and virtual reality.

But where will game studies go in the future? What are the challenges that game studies will face as computer games mature and become a medium not only for entertainment but also for politics and activism? What will happen to games as technological developments take new and unforeseen directions? How can we as a scholarly community be able not only to respond to these rapid developments but also be able to define what games should be in the future? This special issue will be an attempt to illuminate potential avenues for the future of game studies. 

This special issue call is based on the Futures of Games and Game Studies symposium and doctoral consortium organized at the IT University of Copenhagen in April 2022. Participants who attended the event are encouraged to submit, but with this call we also invite submissions from the larger academic community. 

Important dates

Full paper submission deadline: September 1, 2022

Review results: October 15, 2022

Camera ready papers: Dec 1, 2022

Publication: December 2022/January 2023

Submission guidelines

Eludamos accepts submissions of up to 8.000 words, excluding references but including notes and tables. Please make sure your manuscript corresponds to the journal’s formal requirements regarding length, citation style, and so on. For full submission guidelines, see https://www.eludamos.org/index.php/eludamos/information/authors

About Eludamos

Eludamos is an international, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the academic study of computer games and play. Eludamos publishes special issues, but will also accept unsolicited submissions relating to our aims and scope. See full description of Eludamos at https://eludamos.org/index.php/eludamos/about 

Continuer la lecture de CFP: The Futures of Games and Game Studies (Eludamos, special issue)