Archives par mot-clé : japon

CFP: Mechademia U.S. Conference – “Migration and Transition” (Los Angeles/Online)

Mechademia U.S. Conference – “Migration and Transition”

June 28-29, 2022

Los Angeles/Online

Proposal deadline: 10 June 2022

Organized by Frenchy Lunning

Keywords: Anime and/or Manga, Mechademia, trauma, narrative, Asian popular culture, nikkei, conference

Call for papers

Register through Teachable at: https://mechademia.teachable.com/

Keynote speaker: Christine Yano

Migration can be seen as a type of transition, marking a journey from one position to another via movement. This journey may be voluntary or forced, affecting people and communities as they respond to massive events such as wartime, disease, climatic changes, and economic and political upheavals. At the same time, there is also the motivation of hope, of future shifts towards positive aspirations; of the potential for radical change from the present circumstances. Continuer la lecture de CFP: Mechademia U.S. Conference – “Migration and Transition” (Los Angeles/Online)

Publication: Japanese Role-Playing Games – Genre, Representation, and Liminality in the JRPG (Edited by Rachael Hutchinson and Jérémie Pelletier-Gagnon)

Rachael Hutchinson and Jérémie Pelletier-Gagnon (eds.), Japanese Role-Playing Games – Genre, Representation, and Liminality in the JRPG, Lexington Books, 2022

Presentation

Japanese Role-playing Games: Genre, Representation, and Liminality in the JRPG examines the origins, boundaries, and transnational effects of the genre, addressing significant formal elements as well as narrative themes, character construction, and player involvement. Contributors from Japan, Europe, North America, and Australia employ a variety of theoretical approaches to analyze popular game series and individual titles, introducing an English-speaking audience to Japanese video game scholarship while also extending postcolonial and philosophical readings to the Japanese game text. In a three-pronged approach, the collection uses these analyses to look at genre, representation, and liminality, engaging with a multitude of concepts including stereotypes, intersectionality, and the political and social effects of JRPGs on players and industry conventions. Broadly, this collection considers JRPGs as networked systems, including evolved iterations of MMORPGs and card collecting “social games” for mobile devices. Scholars of media studies, game studies, Asian studies, and Japanese culture will find this book particularly useful.

Rachael Hutchinson is professor of Japanese studies at the University of Delaware.

Call for Papers: Replaying Japan 2022 – Games for Learning (Osaka/Online)

Replaying Japan 2022 – The 10th International Japan: Game Studies Conference

Conference theme: Games for Learning

Date: August 25-28, 2022

Location: Hosted online and on site at Osaka Ibaraki Campus by Ritsumeikan University

Deadline for proposals: April 15th, 2022

Please be aware that, as of now, it is not possible to enter Japan on a tourist visa. No exceptions can be made for academic conferences. Participants from outside Japan should assume at this stage that their presentation will be made online. We thank you for your understanding and will update you if there are any changes.

Proposals in Japanese are most welcome! 日本語での発表要旨も受け付けます!

Call for Papers

Since 2012, when we held the first meeting in Edmonton, the Replaying Japan conference has hosted researchers from various fields conducting research on Japanese game culture. The tenth international conference will be hosted by Ritsumeikan University at the Osaka Ibaraki Campus. After a two year hiatus, we hope to have some aspects of this conference conducted on-site, with an online section for those unable to make it to Osaka. Through this conference we wish to continue to celebrate the rich and international research community interested in games and Japan that has evolved since 2012.

This year’s conference theme will be “Games for Learning”. Games in various formats will always have a role in our society, we learn through them, about them, and in playing them. While some might see games as frivolous play, others can see the learning potential gaming can provide. In the right context, games can be a powerful learning tool for children and adults alike.

This theme has been selected to allow participants to demonstrate the broad range in which Japanese games can be used as an instrument for learning. Particular attention will therefore be paid to how learning is represented in Japanese games. Proposals that address games for learning in Japanese game culture are thus encouraged, but other topics are also welcome. This conference focuses broadly on Japanese game culture, education, and industry. It aims to bring academics, educators, and the Japanese game industry together. Academics from all perspectives are welcome, including the humanities, social sciences, business, and education. We encourage poster/demonstration proposals of games or interactive projects related to these themes.

Conference Format

As the conference is being held in a hybrid format (online and on site), we will be following a compressed presentation format where presentations are short to leave time for questions.

  1. Each session will be 30 minutes and will have a chair.
  2. We will ask that full papers/posters/demos be uploaded a week before the conference to a conference website. 
  3. During the online sessions, presenters will not present their papers. Instead they will be given 3 minutes to summarize their work.
  4. There will be a respondent who will comment briefly on the papers/posters/demos and ask the first questions.
  5. We will take written questions from the online chat.
  6. Sessions will be in English, but we will have translation support for presenters who are not comfortable with English.
  7. For work in progress there will be a special Lightning Talks session.
  8. All sessions will be recorded and shared among the participants. We intend to make them accessible to a wider audience after the conference, pending the approval of the speakers.

Submission Guidelines

Abstracts must be submitted to replayingjapan@gmail.com as a MS Word Document. The abstract should be no more than 500 words. Figures, tables and references do not count toward the word limit. Please include your name, affiliation and email address in the email, but not in the submitted abstract. In addition, please add the title of your presentation/demo in the email as well when submitting.

The following paper categories are welcome:

  • Full papers: If accepted you will be expected to submit a paper (around 3,000 words) or a video presentation (up to 20 minutes) in English one week before the conference.
  • Posters/demos: Presenters who want to demonstrate innovative work best shown visually rather than submit a written paper should take advantage of our poster/demo sessions. If accepted you will be expected to submit a poster OR a short video (up to 5 minutes) in English a week before the conference. Again, there will be an online session where you can talk to your poster/demo.
  • Lightning Talks: If you have work in progress that you would like to present we will have a Lightning Talk format. Abstracts can be shorter than 500 words. If accepted you will be expected to post a short video a week before and to submit a single PowerPoint slide. We will have a session when each Lightning Talk presenter will get 1 minute to talk to their slide.

It is understood that by submitting to Replaying Japan 2022 you assert that the work is original and that there are no copyright issues. You also agree to let the University of Alberta post you work and archive the conference proceedings/video/draft papers. 

Note that we plan to have support for Japanese speakers for whom presenting in English is difficult. We will have workshops in Japanese for graduate students on preparing for presentations at international conferences. We will also have ad-hoc translation support during the conference to help with presentations and questions. 

Announcing: The Prince Takamado Japan Centre will also be awarding two essay prizes (1500 words) to the best student presentations on Japanese games. These will have a value of $500 CAD each.

Important dates

Submission of proposals: April 15, 2022

Notification of acceptance: May 31, 2022

Revised proposals in English due: July 15, 2022

Full papers, video presentations, posters etc.: August 10, 2022

Conference: August 25-28, 2022

Contact Information

For more information see www.replaying.jp or contact replayingjapan@gmail.com. 

You can follow us on Twitter at #replayingjapan

Organizing Committee

Replaying Japan 2022 is organized by the Ritsumeikan Center for Game Studies, in collaboration with University of Alberta (AI for Society (AI4S) signature area, the Prince Takamado Japan Centre (PTJC), and the Kule Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS)), University of Delaware, Bath Spa University, Seijoh University, University of Liège, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and DiGRA Japan.

Flavie Falais (Université de Limoges)

Doctorante contractuelle
Université de Limoges – EHIC 1087 (Axe 3)

Sujet de thèse

La question du genre dans le jeu vidéo et les cultures vidéoludiques, sous la direction de Loïc Artiaga.

Thématiques de recherche

Game studies – Play Studies – Études de genre – Cultures populaires & médiatiques – Narrativité vidéoludique – Jeu de rôle – Genres de l’imaginaire – Industries culturelles

Terrains de recherche

France – Europe – Amérique du Nord – Japon

Organisation et participation à des manifestations scientifiques

  • Participation à la préparation de la journée d’étude EHIC : « Autopsie du méchant : de l’ombre à la lumière » (org. Odile Richard, 28 janvier 2021).

Production scientifique

  • Mémoire de Master : « The Witcher, l’art de la narration transmédia », sous la direction de Chloé Ouaked.

Formation 2019 – 2021

  • Master Création Contemporaine et Industries Culturelles (CCIC) – Mention TB

2018 – 2019

  • Licence d’Histoire – Parcours Arts & Humanités

2016 – 2018

  • Classes Préparatoires aux Grandes Ecoles (CPGE A/L) – Option Histoire
  • Expériences professionnelles et associatives Février à Juillet 2021
  • Stagiaire Médiation Culturelle & Coordination de projets à Musiques Métisses (Angoulême)

2019-2020

  • Présidente de l’association étudiante La Péponne

2017 – 2021

  • Co-fondatrice de l’association Café-Diplo Gay-Lussac, conventionnée avec Le Monde Diplomatique

Séminaire LPCM, Séance 2 : Animation japonaise – Mercredi 16 février 2022, 17h-19h

Le séminaire de recherche mensuel de la LPCM vise à favoriser les rencontres et les échanges entre les chercheur·se·s qui se spécialisent dans l’analyse des cultures populaires et médiatiques, quel que soit leur ancrage disciplinaire (littérature, sciences de l’information et de la communication, sociologie, histoire, économie, musicologie, humanités numériques…) et leur objet d’étude (littérature, bande dessinée, littérature jeunesse, cinéma, séries télévisées, productions transmédiatiques, musique, jeux vidéo, jeux, figurines, images…). 

Les séances auront lieu en co-modal.

Organisatrices : Fanny Barnabé (Epitech), Anaïs Goudmand (Sorbonne Université), Aurélie Huz (Université Paris Nanterre), Alice Jacquelin (Université Paris Nanterre)

Séance 2 – Mercredi 16 février 2022, 17h-19h : Animation japonaise

Lieu : Epitech Paris, 18 rue Pasteur, 94270 Kremlin-Bicêtre – Salle Ada Lovelace (4e étage, bâtiment Paritalie) Continuer la lecture de Séminaire LPCM, Séance 2 : Animation japonaise – Mercredi 16 février 2022, 17h-19h

Publication: “Japan’s Contemporary Media Culture between Local and Global: Content, Practice and Theory” (Martin Roth, Hiroshi Yoshida and Martin Picard)

Martin Roth, Hiroshi Yoshida and Martin Picard (dirs.), Japan’s Contemporary Media Culture between Local and Global: Content, Practice and Theory, Berlin, CrossAsia-eBooks, 2021

Presentation

This anthology offers a wide range of research on contemporary media culture in Japan, situating popular media content and its associated practices and theories in the complex interplay between the local and the global. The chapters draw attention to several prominent phenomena, suggest new approaches to the study of media and media cultures, and emphasize the importance of positionality in this context. This volume documents the results of a series of doctoral workshops held in Kyoto and Leipzig between 2017 and 2019, and continues the discussions begun there. Continuer la lecture de Publication: “Japan’s Contemporary Media Culture between Local and Global: Content, Practice and Theory” (Martin Roth, Hiroshi Yoshida and Martin Picard)

Parution : La culture manga. Origines et influences de la bande dessinée japonaise

Bounthavy Suvilay, La culture manga. Origines et influences de la bande dessinée japonaise, Presses Universitaires de Clermont-Ferrand, 2021.

Comment expliquer l’attrait du manga ? Il s’agit sans doute du triomphe moderne du feuilleton en bande dessinée. L’impact de cette culture populaire sur les imaginaires contemporains est lié à l’histoire des médias au Japon. Les dynamiques économiques ont façonné le processus créatif et contribué à la formation d’une poétique matérielle spécifique. Découvrez comment les auteurs japonais soumis à des contraintes de production intense parviennent à cultiver un foisonnement inventif au niveau des genres narratifs, des techniques de représentation et des styles graphiques.

Agrégée de lettres modernes, Bounthavy Suvilay est docteur en littérature. Sa thèse Réceptions et recréations de Dragon Ball en France : manga, anime, jeux vidéo. Pour une histoire matérielle de la fiction (1988-2018) et ses recherches portent sur les adaptations et leur impact sur les perceptions divergentes des œuvres selon les pays. Spécialiste du jeu vidéo, elle a également publié Indie Games. Histoire, artwork, sound design des jeux vidéo indépendants aux éditions Bragelonne et Héroïnes de jeux vidéo. Princesses sans détresse aux éditions Ynnis.

Conference : Replaying Japan 2021 – “Artificial Intelligence in Japanese Game Culture” (University of Alberta, online)

Replaying Japan 2021 – “Artificial Intelligence in Japanese Game Culture

August 9-13, 2021

Online (Zoom and Gather.Town). Register here (for free)

Organized by a partnership of the AI for Society (AI4S) signature area, the Prince Takamado Japan Centre (PTJC), and the Kule Institute for Advanced Study (KIAS) at the University of Alberta. It is organized in collaboration with the Ritsumeikan Center for Game Studies, the University of Delaware, Bath Spa University, Seijoh University, University of Liège, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and DiGRA Japan.

Presentation

Since 2012, when we held the first meeting in Edmonton, the Replaying Japan conference has hosted researchers from various fields conducting research on Japanese game culture. The ninth international conference is also our 10th anniversary meeting. We are returning virtually to the University of Alberta 10 years after we first met for an online conference. We celebrate the rich and international research community that has evolved over the decade.

This year’s conference theme is “Artificial Intelligence in Japanese Game Culture”. Particular attention will therefore be paid to how AI is represented in Japanese games, the evolution of game AIs, and how big data analytics have changed the game industry.

Program

Available here.

With Keynotes from Youichiro MIYAKE (Square Enix, Monday Aug 9) and Eleni STROULIA (University of Alberta, Tuesday Aug 10).

Parution : Dragon Ball : Une histoire française (Bounthavy Suvilay)

Bounthavy Suvilay, Dragon Ball : une histoire française, Presses Universitaires de Liège, 2021.

Dragon Ball n’est pas qu’un manga créé par Akira ­Toriyama en 1984. L’univers de fiction s’étend sur une multitude de supports et il se déploie aujourd’hui encore à travers diverses continuations et séries dérivées. La diffusion de son adaptation animée à la télé­vision est même à l’origine du développement des mangas traduits en France. Les productions contem­poraines prennent d’ailleurs en compte l’importance graduelle des publics occidentaux à mesure que le marché intérieur japonais décline.

Lors des circulations de produits culturels, les acteurs des sociétés locales occupent une position de récep­teurs premiers. Ils interprètent l’œuvre selon le para­digme de lecture de leur pays et ils n’ont pas toujours accès à l’histoire des genres dans laquelle s’inscrit l’objet source. Leurs préconceptions déterminent la manière dont celui-ci est traduit et remodelé. Plu­sieurs stratégies se sont succédées afin d’adapter les objets culturels étrangers aux conventions hexa­gonales. Elles correspondent à des réceptions diver­gentes, chacune produisant des écarts esthétiques qui font émerger un nouveau cadre de compréhen­sion. Ces modifications manifestent les successions d’horizons d’attente de ce premier public (nouvelle traduction, réédition). En retour, ces objets culturels transformés ont modifié à la fois cet environnement cible et l’écosystème source. Les adaptations occiden­tales circulent vers l’Asie et changent à leur tour les conventions de production et de réception.

Prenant appui sur les productions liées à Dragon Ball, cette étude montre comment les adaptations et les circulations internationales modifient les objets culturels. En ce sens, l’objet matériel témoigne de la concrétisation d’un cadre de compréhension. Il est un dispositif rendant visible l’articulation entre production, diffusion et réception. Il concrétise un dialogue où les différents publics renégocient le réfé­rent et les manières de l’appréhender. L’histoire des réceptions permet ainsi de saisir les processus his­toriques ayant conduit à ces transformations culturelles.

Agrégée de Lettres modernes, Bounthavy Suvilay est docteur en Littérature. Ses recherches portent sur les transformations liées aux adaptations des récits de fiction dans différents médias et leurs impacts sur les réceptions divergentes des œuvres selon les pays. Spécialiste du jeu vidéo, elle a également publié Indie Games – Histoire, artwork, sound design des jeux vidéo indépendants (Paris, Bragelonne, 2018).

Colloque: Mechademia International Conference – Kyoto 2021

Mechademia International Conference: Kyoto 2021

June 5-6, 2021

Online

Organized by Frenchy Lunning, Stevie Suan, Sookyung Yoo, Edmund Hoff, and Andy Scott

Presentation

The Mechademia International Conference: Kyoto 2021, will present the presentations from the cancelled 2020 Conference – now fully online. The asynchronous presentations are now loaded onto a Teachable site, and once you have registered, you may watch them anytime, from any zone globally. Then, on June 5-6, 2021, there will be synchronous sessions of live online Q+As from each of the panels, and two Keynote presentations. 

This conference is now open to the public.

To register for the public attendee access on the Teachable site, go to:

https://mechademia.teachable.com/p/sales

Non-presenting public attendee’ categories have been added to the page above. Students or associates who would like to view the presentations and discussions can sign up through those categories. (1000 yen for students and independent scholars, 3000 yen for full-time faculty).

For questions, go to: asiaconference@mechademia.net

Continuer la lecture de Colloque: Mechademia International Conference – Kyoto 2021