Archives par mot-clé : gender studies

Call for papers: Doing Women’s Film and Television History V (Hybrid Conference)

DWFTH 5 revised for 2021: New call for papers–‘Histories of Women in Film and Television: Then and Now.’ A Hybrid Conference

July 10 – 11, 2021 (virtual and on-campus)

Conference Website

Call for Papers

Supported by Women’s Film & Television History Network, this call for papers is made in collaboration with ‘Women and the BBC’, a special themed issue of Critical Studies in Television.

The year 2020 has caused a great deal of sorrow, anxiety and difficulty across the world. With health and safety of paramount concern, conferences and research events – including the planned Doing Women’s Film and Television History conference – have been either impossible to hold in-person or, given the challenges presented by the need to sustain teaching and student welfare, deprioritized.  As we look towards 2021, we understand that social distancing measures and travel limitations will possibly continue. With this in mind, we plan to host a hybrid conference as an outlet for our research that will enable us to share our scholarship with others, form connections and offer potential for collaboration. If national and institutional public health measures allow, the conference will combine on-campus and virtual events. While virtual conferences present new technical and communicative challenges, we also see the opportunities that this type of conference affords. Not requiring travel, it both reduces expense and can broaden networks of scholars.

Continuer la lecture de Call for papers: Doing Women’s Film and Television History V (Hybrid Conference)

Parution : Métamorphoses en culture d’enfance et d’adolescence. Questions de genre

Métamorphoses en culture d’enfance et d’adolescence. Questions de genre, Anne-Marie Mercier-Faivre, Dominique Perrin (dir.), Presses Universitaires de Bordeaux, coll. « Études sur le Livre de Jeunesse », 2020. 

La métamorphose semble revenue au premier plan dans les littératures d’enfance et d’adolescence, comme dans la culture populaire. Les vampires, loups-garous, hybrides et anges déchus sont les héros cathartiques des narrations contemporaines. Cet essor d’un imaginaire qui reprend des figures anciennes suscite de nombreuses questions.
Ce livre offre une réflexion panoramique et historique sur le champ de la littérature pour la jeunesse comme sur ses déclinaisons en images (mangas, films) et ses modes de réception particuliers (fan-fictions). Comme dans Pinocchio et dans les aventures d’Alice, le mythe contemporain continue à mettre en scène des questions cruciales en figurant des êtres qui changent, image de la croissance mais aussi de l’inscription dans une identité sexuée. Mais quels sont les enjeux de ce mythe en ce début de millénaire ? Jusqu’à quel point se transforme-t-il ?
De prime abord, le plus frappant est que la métamorphose devient une chance, l’horizon à atteindre d’une adaptation merveilleuse. L’être métamorphosé n’est plus l’autre que l’on regarde mais un miroir de celui que l’on pourrait devenir. Au prisme de ce thème, sont interrogés les rapports entre féminin et masculin, humain et non-humain, vie et mort, essence et artifice. Des classiques de la métamorphose aux figures et pratiques singulières de la période actuelle – de la culture sérielle au domaine littéraire –, les objets et questions envisagés ici mettent en lumière des mutations cruciales pour la compréhension d’un imaginaire contemporain.

The Sexualization Report

The Sexualization Report

People are worried about sexualization; about children becoming sexual at too young an age; about the ways in which women may be being defined by their sexuality; and about the availability and potential effects of online pornography, to name but a few of the often repeated concerns.

This report has been compiled by Feona Attwood, Clare Bale and Meg Barker based on contributions from over thirty academic experts, drawing on research from a wide range of subject areas, including medicine, health and social care, media and communication studies, cultural studies, psychology, sociology, education, and gender & sexuality studies.

You can access the report here http://thesexualizationreport.wordpress.com

The report addresses the wide range of issues relating to sex, sexuality and sexual health and wellbeing that seem to underpin public anxieties that are now commonly expressed as concerns about ‘sexualization’. These include STIs, pregnancy, addiction, dysfunction, violence, abuse, sex work, sexual practices, different forms of sexuality, medicalization, commerce, media and popular culture. It aims to summarize what is known – and not yet known – on each of the main areas of concern.

The report has been written with a range of professionals in mind; people whose job it is to inform and advise others about sex, sexuality and sexual health and who need to draw on the best possible information. This includes journalists and broadcasters, policy makers, educators, therapists and other health professionals. This is very much a living report, offering an overview of what research tells us at the moment. Our intention is to find ways of developing and expanding this, in order to offer professionals an up to date and reliable source of information about a wide range of issues relating to sex, sexuality and sexual health.

Call for paper – appel à communication : ESSACHESS, volume 7, n°2(14)/2014

Call for Papers for volume 7, n° 2(14)/ 2014

FRENCH BELOW

How does Gender matter? Analyzing media discourses, media organizations and media practices

Guest editors:

Margreth LŰNENBORG (Director of the International Centre of Journalism, Free University of Berlin, Germany)

Using the concept of gender as a crosscutting principle underlying all aspects of social life (work, family, religion, migration, research, etc.) we intend to highlight the gender dimension of social life, a major phenomenon ignored for a long time (some researchers such as Marcel Mauss identified the division by gender as a fundamental matrix even if most sciences: from sociology to medicine were gender blind). The “liquidity of the modern society” (Bauman) also marked the concept of gender, floating “between social sex”, “gender relations” or “gender difference” understood as a socio-anthropological difference constructed and disseminated through standards and customs both practiced by and distributed via media. Entered fully into the social sciences (sociology and history in the first place), the gender is built conceptually in a wide range of feminist theories (universalists, differentialists, Marxists, radicals, deconstructionists, culturalists, queer) as a “differential valence” (Françoise Héritier) which provides / prospects on « the genesis and transmission of inequality and gender and sexual hierarchies » (I. Thery, 2010); gender is a relevant but not single dimension of social and cultural inequality as discussed in the concept of intersectionality.

The approach in terms of gender represents a paradigm shift in the Kuhnian sense, since it involves the radical transformation of social representations and collective values and norms, transformation correlated with the democratization of societies and promotion of the equality principle.

“Gender is a socially imposed division of the sexes. It is the product of social relations of sexuality. Kinship systems are based on marriage. They transform males and females in men and women”. (Gayle Rubin, 1975/1998).

In accordance with feminist methodology breaking with the epistemic ideal of “objectivity” to use the grounded theory rooted in the field, observation and data collection in situ, we are interested in papers referring to the analysis of the gendered structures and gendering practices of media images, media discourse and media practices.

In the theoretical tradition of Luce Irigaray articulations and modalities of communication distinguish male and female discourse. If speaking is never neutral to resume Luce Irigaray, we think we believe that the issues related to the use of discourse and media genres in the “feminine” media are as important as the presence / absence of women in mainstream media, especially in the news. The findings are that men and women do not use language in a similar way therefore demonstrates that language is gendered. The feminist theorists assert that it would be possible to create new forms of female thought, transforming the structures of the traditional way of thinking, because “it is not enough to change certain things in the horizon that defines human culture, but to change the horizon itself” (Luce Irigaray, 1992: 36). Yet these changes of horizon include both the change in the message, change of media production and obviously change the public.

Following Judith Butler’s concept of performativity of sex and gender (1990, 1993), we need to go beyond the essentialist concepts of “femininity” and “masculinity”. Thus distinctions between “male” and “female” writing, talking or reading are seen as obsolete. How can we then analyse distinct concepts of writing, journalistic production, public forms of articulation? How do we conceptualize the relationship of gendered media practices, media images and social constructions of gender?

Angela McRobbie (2009) refers to the term “Postfeminism” when critically discussing how originally feminist approaches to new gender relations have been instrumentally incorporated into popular culture. Thus we need to ask how to analyse the relationship of popular culture and changing gender orders.

Both Francophone and Anglophone approaches and concepts discussed in the field of gender studies refer to distinct theoretical framework, but offer complex opportunities for bridging academic cultures. We thus are interested in theoretical and empirical work going beyond well-established concepts of explanation and interpretation.

Analyses can be addressed (without excluding other possible approaches and angles) to:

i) Gender / women’s issues as topics of the mainstream media (such as the unemployment of women, female migration, female poverty, health etc.) and the journalistic treatment of these issues: scientific, sensationalist or trivialized in the print and online media;

– the manner of articulating the iconic and verbal text in the case of the representation of different sexes in the same referential area (sportswomen fragmented and connoted in the mode of appearance: emotion, aestheticism and sportsmen in the mode of being: prize, victory; in the field of politics the gendered conceptualization of power and success, the representation of political bodies etc.)

– the impact of the message on the public;

ii) the thematic and organizational modes of discourse (narrative, argumentative, descriptive) in the « feminine »  media (correlated or not to post-feminism, to backlash of feminism or to ordinary anti-feminism);

– the hybridization of genres and types of discourse by intertextuality / intersemioticity/ plurimodality.

iii) the gendered practices of and by digital media: modes of incorporation of media practices into professional habits and routines as well as into ‘private’ lifeworlds; the use of digital media in protest cultures (e.g. FEMEN).

The selected study corpus may be represented by all forms of media content including press, audio-visual media as well as online communication (electronic journals, personal blogs, professional blogs, etc.). Analyzing practices and discursive strategies of media in their constitutive relationship to gender structures in society we propose interdisciplinary reflections bringing together sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists, linguists and semioticians, researchers from information sciences, media and communication, interested gender images, actions and aspirations.

The field of gender studies has been a work in progress for more than forty years not only in Western countries, but also in non-European space. Gender studies develop complex theoretical perspectives, innovative methodologies evolved into practices (e.g. action research), and practices are used within and outside of academia. Our volume participates in the global movement of de-westernization of research and denaturalization of ‘gender hierarchy’ building a new reflexivity with the ultimate goal of emancipation

The analysis in the context of “situated knowledge” located at the intersection of political, economic and social ‘redistribution’ (absent from the public debate) and the policies of the specific claims of national or cultural minorities ‘recognition’ could show how identity minorisation goes hand in hand with the socio-economic discrimination in inertia of gender roles produced by the institutions of socialization

As we are now in a century characterized by “fast and furious developments in media products, technologies and institutions” (K. Ross, 2009) it becomes essential to re-examine in a critical perspective the concepts of media representation, media discourse, media practice bridging media culture and academy. We especially aim at bringing together the Anglophone research as well as the Francophone research in the field.

Important Deadlines

February 15, 2014: submission of the proposal in the form of an abstract of 400-500 words. The proposal must include a list of recent references;

– March 30, 2014: acceptance of the proposal;

July 15, 2014: full paper submission;

– September 30, 2014: full paper acceptance.

Papers should be between 6,000-10,000 words in length. Papers can be submitted in English or French. The abstracts should be in English and French, max. 200-250 words followed by 5 keywords. Please provide the full names, affiliations, and e-mail addresses of all authors, indicating the contact author. Papers, and any queries, should be sent to: essachess@gmail.com

Authors of the accepted papers will be notified by e-mail. The journal will be published in December 2014.

References

  • Bem, Sandra, 1993 The Lenses of Gender: Transforming the Debate on Sexual Inequalities,New Haven, Yale University Press.
  • Blandin, Claire & Méadel, Cécile (éditrices) 2009,  « La Cause des femmes » dossier thématique Le Temps des médias no 12, printemps-été.
  • Butler Judith, 1990, Gender Trouble : Feminism and the Subversion of Identity London Routledge (trad.fr. 2005, Trouble dans le genre: pour un féminisme de la subversion, Paris, La Découverte).
  • Butler, Judith, 1993 Bodies that Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex” , New York, Routledge Byerly Carolyn and Ross Karen, 2006 Women and Media. A Critical Introduction, Blackwell.
  • Chabaud-Rychter, Danielle, Descoutures, Virginie, Devreux, Anne-Marie,Varikas, Eleni, (sous la direction de), 2010, Sous les sciences sociales le genre. Relectures critique de Max Weber à Bruno Latour, Paris, La Découverte.
  • Carter Cynthia, Branston Gill, Stuart Allen (eds), 1998 News, Gender and Power, London, Routledge
  • De Bruin Marian and Ross Karen (eds), 2004, Gender and Newsroom Cultures, Hampton Press, pp. 81-104.
  • Dorlin, Elsa (sous la direction de), 2010, Sexe, Race, Classe Pour une épistémologie de la domination, Paris, PUF.
  • Gauntlett, David, 2008, Media, Gender and Identity, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Gill Rosalind, 2006, Gender and the Media, Cambridge, Polity Press.
  • Gill Rosalind and Scharff Christina, 2013, New Femininities. Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Gubin, Eliane; Jacques Catherine; Rochefort Florence; Studer Brigitte; Thébaud Françoise ; Zancarini-Fournel Michelle, 2004,  Le siècle des féminismes, Paris, Editions de l’Atelier.
  • Harding, Sandra, (dir.), 2004, The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Héritier, Françoise, 1996, Masculin, féminin. I. La pensée de la différence, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Hirata, Helena; Laborie, Françoise; Le Doaré, Hélène; Senotier, Danièle, 2000, Dictionnaire critique du féminisme, Paris, PUF.
  • Lazar, Michelle (ed.), 2005, Feminist Critical Discourse Analysis:Gender, Power and Ideology in Discourse, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Lünenborg, Margreth, Majer, Tanya (eds.), 2013 Gender Media Studies. Eine Einführung, Konstanz, UVK.
  • McRobbie, Angela, 2009 The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change, London, Sage.
  • Neveu, Eric, 2001, „Le genre du journalisme. Des ambivalences de la féminisation d’une profession”, Politix, 13, 51, 2000, pp. 179-212.
  • Ollivier, Michèle, Tremblay, Manon, 2000, Questionnements féministes et méthodologie de la recherche, Montréal, Harmattan.
  • «  Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States :Women and the Media- Advancing Gender Equality in decision-making in media organizations», 2013, Report realized by EIGE (European Institute for Gender Equality), Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union
  • Robinson, Gertrude, 2005, Gender, Journalism and Equity: Canadian, U.S and European Perspectives, Hampton Press, Communication Series, Cresskill, New Jersey.
  • Ross, Karen, 2009, Gendered Media. Women, Men and Identity Politics, Rowman & Littlefield Publications
  • Ross Karen, 2011, « Women and News. A long and winding road », Media, Culture and Society vol.33, no 8, 99, pp. 1148-1165.
  • Rubin, Gayle, 1975 (1998), « L’économie politique du sexe. Transactions sur les femmes et systèmes de sexe/genre », Cahiers d’études féministes, Paris, CEDREF no 7, pp. 3-81.
  • Roventa-Frumusani, Daniela, 2009, Concepts fondamentaux pour les études de genre, Paris, Editions des Archives Contemporaines.
  • Scott, Joan 1988) «Genre: une catégorie utile d’analyse historique », Cahiers du Grif: le genre de l’histoire, no 37-38, printemps, pp. 125-153.
  • Saint-Jean, Armande, 2000,  « L’apport des femmes au renouvellement des pratiques professionnelles : le cas des journalistes » in Recherches féministes vol 13, no 2, pp.77-93.
  • Thébaud, Françoise, 2003 « Histoire des femmes, histoire du genre et sexe du chercheur » in Jacqueline Laufer, Catherine Mary, Margaret Maruani (dir.) Le travail du genre. Les sciences sociales à l’épreuve des différences de sexe, Paris, La Découverte,/MAGE, pp.70-87.
  • Théry, Irène, 2007, La distinction de sexe. Une nouvelle approche de l’égalité, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Théry, Irène, 2010 « Le genre : identité des personnes ou modalité des relations sociales ? » in Revue française de pédagogie, 171, avril-mai-juin, pp. 103-117.
  • Van Zoonen, Liesbet, 2002, Feminist Media Studies, London, Sage Publications.

***

La dimension de genre dans les discours, organisations et pratiques médiatiques

Coordination du dossier :

Margreth LŰNENBORG (Directrice du Centre International du Journalisme, Université Libre, Berlin, Allemagne) et

Daniela ROVENTA-FRUMUSANI (Directrice du Département d’Anthropologie culturelle et Communication, Université de Bucarest, Roumanie)

En utilisant la notion de genre comme principe transversal sous-tendant toutes les composantes de la vie sociale : travail, famille, religion, migration, recherche, etc., nous nous proposons au travers de ce dossier de mettre en exergue la dimension sexuée de la vie sociale, aspect majeur longtemps ignoré (très peu de chercheurs parmi lesquels Marcel Mauss ont considéré la division par sexes comme matrice fondamentale alors que la plupart des sciences, de la sociologie à la médecine étaient gender blind). La « liquidité de la société moderne » (Bauman) a marqué aussi le concept de genre se situant entre « entre sexe social », « rapports sociaux de sexe » ou « différence de sexes » entendue comme différence socio-anthropologique construite et disséminée à travers les normes et les coutumes. Entré de plain-pied dans les sciences sociales (d’abord la sociologie et l’histoire), le genre s’édifie conceptuellement dans le vaste champ des théories féministes (universalistes, différentialistes, marxistes, radicales, déconstructionnistes, culturalistes, queer) comme « valence différentielle « (F. Héritier) qui fournit une / des perspective(s) sur « la genèse et la transmission des inégalités et hiérarchies sexuées et sexuelles» (I. Thery, 2010).

L’approche en termes de genre représente un changement paradigmatique dans le sens de T. Kuhn puisqu’elle implique la transformation radicale des représentations sociales, des valeurs et normes collectives, transformation connexe à la démocratisation des sociétés et à la promotion du principe d’égalité.

« Le genre est une division des sexes socialement imposée. Il est le produit des rapports sociaux de sexualité. Les systèmes de parenté reposent sur le mariage. Ils transforment donc des mâles et des femelles en « hommes » et en « femmes », chaque catégorie étant une moitié incomplète qui ne peut trouver sa plénitude que dans l’union avec l’autre. » (G. Rubin, 1998 : 48).

En accord avec la méthodologie féministe rompant avec la recherche « objective » pour utiliser la grounded theory enracinée dans le terrain – l’observation et le recueil de données in situ, ce dossier s’intéresse également à interroger toutes les expériences oubliées ou refoulées afin d’éclairer trois univers essentiels : l’économique, le politique et le scientifique dans leurs images et stéréotypes médiatiques.

Puisque « parler n’est jamais neutre » pour reprendre une citation de Luce Irigaray, on pourrait dire que les enjeux liés à l’usage de la langue et du discours dans les médias « au féminin » sont aussi importants que la présence / absence des femmes dans les mainstream / malestream media (surtout dans les news). Les théoriciennes féministes affirment qu’il serait possible de créer de nouvelles formes de pensée féminine en transformant les structures mêmes du système traditionnel de pensée, car « il ne suffit pas de changer telle ou telle chose dans l’horizon qui définit la culture humaine, mais bien de changer l’horizon lui-même » (L. Irigaray, 1992 : 36). Or, ce changement d’horizon comprend aussi bien le changement du message, le changement de la production médiatique et bien évidemment le changement du public .

En reprenant le concept de performativité du genre (J. Butler 1990, 1993) on réaffirme la nécessité d’aller au-delà des concepts essentialistes de « féminité » et de « masculinité ». Comment peut-on analyser les concepts d’écriture journalistique, d’articulation production / interprétation des messages journalistiques à travers le prisme du genre ? Quelle est la relation entre les images médiatiques, les pratiques journalistiques et la construction  sociale du genre ?

Angela McRobbie (2009) aborde de manière critique la modalité dans laquelle les approches originales du féminisme et surtout les « rapports sociaux de sexe » ont été incorporés et instrumentalisés dans la popular culture au seuil du troisième millénaire. Il nous semble légitime d’examiner les rapports qu’entretiennent la culture media et l’ordre du genre.

Les recherches anglophone et francophone conceptualisent de manière différente le champ des gender studies. Dans ce contexte, ce numéro de la revue Essachess – Journal for Communication Studies tente de rassembler ces cadres théoriques distincts afin d’offrir un tableau de l’actualité de la recherche sur le genre.

Les propositions pourront s’intéresser aux :

i) thématiques « féminines » de la presse généraliste (chômage des femmes, migration au féminin, pauvreté au féminin, santé, etc.) et leur approche (scientifique, sensationnaliste, banalisant, etc.) dans la presse papier et / ou en ligne ;

– la manière d’articuler  iconiquement et visuellement le texte dans le cas de la représentation des sexes différents dans la même zone référentielle (sportives « fragmentarisées » et connotées dans la logique du paraître – émotion, esthétisation –  et sportifs dans la logique de l’être – prix, victoire);

– l’impact du message sur les publics ;

ii) thématiques et modes d’organisation du discours (narrativité, argumentativité, description) dans les médias « au féminin » (médias corrélés ou non au post féminisme, au backlash du féminisme ou à l‘antiféminisme ordinaire) ;

– l’hybridation des genres et des modes de discours par intertextualité / intersémioticité / plurimodalité ;

iii) les pratiques genrées de la presse en ligne : la transformation des pratiques médiatiques par l’incorporation des nouvelles routines dans la vie professionnelle ainsi que dans la vie privée ; l’utilisation des moyens digitaux dans les cultures de la protestation (e.g. FEMEN).

Les corpus choisis pourraient être constitués des textes  de presse écrite et audio-visuelle ainsi que des cybertextes (journaux  électroniques, blogs professionnels, etc.).

En se focalisant sur l’analyse des pratiques et des stratégies discursives des medias conjugués d’une façon ou d’une autre à la problématique des femmes, ce dossier vise également à réunir des recherches interdisciplinaires menées par les chercheurs en sciences de l’information et de la communication avec les sociologues, les anthropologues, les sémioticiens, les linguistes, etc. qui s’intéressent aux femmes journalistes et aux images  et problématiques de genre.

Le domaine des gender studies est un work in progress depuis plus de quarante ans dans les pays de l’Europe Occidentale et de l’Est mais aussi dans l’espace non européen. Les études de genre développent des perspectives théoriques complexes, des méthodologies novatrices transformées en pratiques (recherche-action par exemple) utilisées et utilisables à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de l’Académie. Dans ce cadre, ce volume participera au mouvement global de désoccidentalisation de la recherche et de dénaturalisation de la « valence différentielle des sexes » (F. Héritier), construisant une nouvelle réflexivité dans le but ultime de l’émancipation d’une moitié de l’humanité.

L’analyse dans le cadre de la « connaissance située », à l’intersection des politiques de « redistribution » économique et sociale (absentes du débat public) et des politiques de la « reconnaissance » propres aux revendications des « minorités » pourrait mettre en évidence la manière dont la minorisation identitaire va de pair avec la discrimination socio-économique dans une inertie des rôles de genre produits par les instances de socialisation.

Au seuil du troisième millénaire caractérisé par des développements rapides et turbulents des produits, technologies et institutions médiatiques (K. Ross, 2009), il devient essentiel de réexaminer dans une perspective critique les concepts de représentation et de discours media, de pratique journalistique dans une connectivité reliant culture media et académie, recherche francophone et recherche anglophone.

Dates importantes :

– 15 février 2014 : envoi de la proposition d’article sous forme d’un résumé d’environ 2500-3500 signes espaces compris (comportant 5 mots clés et bibliographie sélective récente) ;

– 30 mars 2014 : notification des résultats ;

15 juillet 2014 : soumission intégrale de l’article;

– 30 septembre 2014 : acceptation définitive de l’article.

Les articles devront comprendre entre 20 000 et 25 000 signes espaces compris. Ils peuvent être soumis en français ou en anglais et doivent être accompagnés d`un résumé en français et en anglais (200-250 mots), de 5 mots clés, des noms, ainsi que des affiliations et adresses e-mail de tous les auteurs. Les articles et questions complémentaires doivent être adressés à : essachess@gmail.com

Les auteurs dont les articles auront été acceptés en seront avisés par e-mail. La revue sera publiée le 23 décembre 2014.

Références

  • Bem, Sandra, 1993 The Lenses of Gender: Transforming the Debate on Sexual Inequalities,New Haven, Yale University Press.
  • Blandin, Claire & Méadel, Cécile (éditrices) 2009,  « La Cause des femmes » dossier thématique Le Temps des médias no 12, printemps-été.
  • Butler Judith, 1990, Gender Trouble : Feminism and the Subversion of Identity London Routledge (trad.fr. 2005, Trouble dans le genre: pour un féminisme de la subversion, Paris, La Découverte).
  • Butler, Judith, 1993 Bodies that Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex” , New York, Routledge Byerly Carolyn and Ross Karen, 2006 Women and Media. A Critical Introduction, Blackwell.
  • Chabaud-Rychter, Danielle, Descoutures, Virginie, Devreux, Anne-Marie,Varikas, Eleni, (sous la direction de), 2010, Sous les sciences sociales le genre. Relectures critique de Max Weber à Bruno Latour, Paris, La Découverte.
  • Carter Cynthia, Branston Gill, Stuart Allen (eds), 1998 News, Gender and Power, London, Routledge
  • De Bruin Marian and Ross Karen (eds), 2004, Gender and Newsroom Cultures, Hampton Press, pp. 81-104.
  • Dorlin, Elsa (sous la direction de), 2010, Sexe, Race, Classe Pour une épistémologie de la domination, Paris, PUF.
  • Gauntlett, David, 2008, Media, Gender and Identity, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Gill Rosalind, 2006, Gender and the Media, Cambridge, Polity Press.
  • Gill Rosalind and Scharff Christina, 2013, New Femininities. Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Gubin, Eliane; Jacques Catherine; Rochefort Florence; Studer Brigitte; Thébaud Françoise ; Zancarini-Fournel Michelle, 2004,  Le siècle des féminismes, Paris, Editions de l’Atelier.
  • Harding, Sandra, (dir.), 2004, The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Héritier, Françoise, 1996, Masculin, féminin. I. La pensée de la différence, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Hirata, Helena; Laborie, Françoise; Le Doaré, Hélène; Senotier, Danièle, 2000, Dictionnaire critique du féminisme, Paris, PUF.
  • Lazar, Michelle (ed.), 2005, Feminist Critical Discourse Analysis:Gender, Power and Ideology in Discourse, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Lünenborg, Margreth, Majer, Tanya (eds.), 2013 Gender Media Studies. Eine Einführung, Konstanz, UVK.
  • McRobbie, Angela, 2009 The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change, London, Sage.
  • Neveu, Eric, 2001, „Le genre du journalisme. Des ambivalences de la féminisation d’une profession”, Politix, 13, 51, 2000, pp. 179-212.
  • Ollivier, Michèle, Tremblay, Manon, 2000, Questionnements féministes et méthodologie de la recherche, Montréal, Harmattan.
  • «  Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States :Women and the Media- Advancing Gender Equality in decision-making in media organizations», 2013, Report realized by EIGE (European Institute for Gender Equality), Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union
  • Robinson, Gertrude, 2005, Gender, Journalism and Equity: Canadian, U.S and European Perspectives, Hampton Press, Communication Series, Cresskill, New Jersey.
  • Ross, Karen, 2009, Gendered Media. Women, Men and Identity Politics, Rowman & Littlefield Publications
  • Ross Karen, 2011, « Women and News. A long and winding road », Media, Culture and Society vol.33, no 8, 99, pp. 1148-1165.
  • Rubin, Gayle, 1975 (1998), « L’économie politique du sexe. Transactions sur les femmes et systèmes de sexe/genre », Cahiers d’études féministes, Paris, CEDREF no 7, pp. 3-81.
  • Roventa-Frumusani, Daniela, 2009, Concepts fondamentaux pour les études de genre, Paris, Editions des Archives Contemporaines.
  • Scott, Joan 1988) «Genre: une catégorie utile d’analyse historique », Cahiers du Grif: le genre de l’histoire, no 37-38, printemps, pp. 125-153.
  • Saint-Jean, Armande, 2000,  « L’apport des femmes au renouvellement des pratiques professionnelles : le cas des journalistes » in Recherches féministes vol 13, no 2, pp.77-93.
  • Thébaud, Françoise, 2003 « Histoire des femmes, histoire du genre et sexe du chercheur » in Jacqueline Laufer, Catherine Mary, Margaret Maruani (dir.) Le travail du genre. Les sciences sociales à l’épreuve des différences de sexe, Paris, La Découverte,/MAGE, pp.70-87.
  • Théry, Irène, 2007, La distinction de sexe. Une nouvelle approche de l’égalité, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Théry, Irène, 2010 « Le genre : identité des personnes ou modalité des relations sociales ? » in Revue française de pédagogie, 171, avril-mai-juin, pp. 103-117.
  • Van Zoonen, Liesbet, 2002, Feminist Media Studies, London, Sage Publications.

Publication : Gender and Power in Contemporary Spirituality. Ethnographie Approaches

Gender and Power in Contemporary Spirituality

Ethnographic Approaches

Edited by Anna Fedele and Kim Knibbe

This book contains captivating descriptions of the entanglements of gender and power in spiritual practices and detailed analyses of the strategies spiritual practitioners use to attain what to social scientists might seem an impossible goal: creating spiritual communities without creating gendered hierarchies.

Contemporary spiritual practitioners tend to present their own spirituality as non-hierarchical and gender equal, in contrast to ‘established’ religions. Current studies of these movements often reproduce their selfdescription as empowering, while other literature reacts polemically against these movements, describing them as narcissist and irrelevant and/or in league with capitalism. This book moves between these two poles, recognizing that gender and power are always at work in any socio-cultural situation.

What strategies do people within these networks use to attain gender equality and gendered empowerment?

How do they try to protect and develop individual freedom? How do gender and power nevertheless play a role?

The contributions collected in this book demonstrate that in order to understand contemporary spirituality the analytical lenses of gender and power are essential. Furthermore, they show that it is not possible to make a clear distinction between established religions and contemporary spirituality:

the two sometimes overlap, at other times spirituality uses religion to play off against while reproducing some of the underlying interpretative frameworks. While recognizing the reflexivity of spiritual practitioners and the reciprocal relationship between spirituality and disciplines such as anthropology, the authors do not take the discourses of spiritual practitioners for granted. Their ethnographic descriptions of lived spirituality span a wide range of countries, from Portugal, Italy and the Netherlands to Mexico and Israel.

“An important and original contribution to the understanding of the dynamics of gender and power in alternative forms of spirituality.” – Sabina Magliocco, California StateUniversity, Northridge, USA

Central to spirituality is a desire for personal liberation, we hear again and again. Yet this rich collection of ethnographies demonstrates that it is deeply shaped by performances ofgender and power.” – Dick Houtman, Erasmus University, Netherlands

https://genderandpowerincontemporaryspirituality.wordpress.com/

Call for papers : Media Spaces of Gender and Sexuality, Media Fields Journal

CFP: Media Spaces of Gender and Sexuality

Media Fields Journal

University of California, Santa Barbara

This issue of Media Fields investigates the connections between media, space, gender, and sexuality, seeking conversations that center on these interrelations and negotiations. We invite papers that raise questions of how media spaces construct gender, and how gender, in turn, constructs media spaces; how spaces condition and are conditioned by gender performances and sexual practices; and how gender legibility limits (or allows) access to various media spaces.

Film and media scholarship historically came of age through its study of the relationship between gender, sexuality, and media. Much has been written about the status of women as objects of the cinematic gaze, as well as about the status of female and queer-identified subjects as media producers. Yet in more recent times, issues of gender and sexuality have once again become marginalized in academic discourse, revealing the need for new explorations that coincide with the impact of the “spatial turn.” In this age of conflict, dissent, surveillance, and migration—when the study of media is often also the study of the precariousness and dynamism of the spatial—it is particularly important to trace the interconnections between space, media, and gender.

We seek scholarship that deals with space in a range of ways: essays might discuss online spaces that allow for specific negotiations of gender or sexuality, or with gender embodiment in physical spaces of various scales, from the very local (the living room, for example) to the global. Essays might also draw upon feminist interventions into Marxist/historical materialist theories of space, as well as engaging the intersections between gender, race, and class. These important intersections exceed the label, “identity politics”—a label that we feel is now often deployed in order to debunk the continued relevance of gender and sexuality to any scholarly conversation. While we do indeed call for political approaches to gender and space—essays informed by the agendas of feminist and queer activism—we stress that gender and sexuality are not merely areas of special interest, but are instead structuring principles of discrimination that permeate our lives on a number of registers.

Thus, our approach is multivalent. We invite submissions that consider this complexity, possibly addressing the following topics:

  • Transnational Queer and Feminist Media: How are flows of bodies, labor, capital, and images gendered and sexualized?
  • Queering Questions of Scale: How does heterosexism delimit notions of nation, state, and the transnational?
  • Gendered Spaces of Conflict and Dissent: How do media contribute to the gendering of the different spaces of war and dissent as well as of the subjects who are involved?
  • Gender, Sexuality, and Online Spaces: How are social media practices and spaces gendered and sexualized?
  • Queer/Feminist Gaming: representations of gendered and sexualized spaces in mainstream video games, gendered geographies of video game production,  gendered spaces of gaming culture
  • Spaces of Surveillance: How is surveillance fundamentally gendered, sexualized, and spatialized? How does voyeurism continue to bolster certain experiences of space and place?
  • Gendered Infrastructures: How are media infrastructures gendered, and why does this matter?
  • Gender, Sexuality and Access: How do gender and its legibility (e.g., normativity) result in certain types of access to particular spaces?

We are looking for essays of 1500-2500 words, digital art projects, and audio or video interviews exploring the relationship between gender, sexuality, and space. We encourage approaches to this topic from scholars in cinema and media studies, anthropology, architecture, art and art history, communication, ecology, geography, literature, musicology, sociology, and other relevant fields.

Feel free to contact issue co-editors, Hannah Goodwin and Lindsay Palmer, with proposals and inquiries.

Email submissions, proposals, and inquiries to submissions@mediafieldsjournal.org by May 30th, 2013.