The Sexualization Report

The Sexualization Report

People are worried about sexualization; about children becoming sexual at too young an age; about the ways in which women may be being defined by their sexuality; and about the availability and potential effects of online pornography, to name but a few of the often repeated concerns.

This report has been compiled by Feona Attwood, Clare Bale and Meg Barker based on contributions from over thirty academic experts, drawing on research from a wide range of subject areas, including medicine, health and social care, media and communication studies, cultural studies, psychology, sociology, education, and gender & sexuality studies.

You can access the report here http://thesexualizationreport.wordpress.com

The report addresses the wide range of issues relating to sex, sexuality and sexual health and wellbeing that seem to underpin public anxieties that are now commonly expressed as concerns about ‘sexualization’. These include STIs, pregnancy, addiction, dysfunction, violence, abuse, sex work, sexual practices, different forms of sexuality, medicalization, commerce, media and popular culture. It aims to summarize what is known – and not yet known – on each of the main areas of concern.

The report has been written with a range of professionals in mind; people whose job it is to inform and advise others about sex, sexuality and sexual health and who need to draw on the best possible information. This includes journalists and broadcasters, policy makers, educators, therapists and other health professionals. This is very much a living report, offering an overview of what research tells us at the moment. Our intention is to find ways of developing and expanding this, in order to offer professionals an up to date and reliable source of information about a wide range of issues relating to sex, sexuality and sexual health.

Ph.D. Summer School: Cultural Im/materialities: Contagion, Affective Rhythms and Mobilization

Ph.D. Summer School: Cultural Im/materialities: Contagion, Affective Rhythms and Mobilization

2nd Ph.D. Summer School of Cultural Transformations: Cultural Im/materialities: Contagion, Affective Rhythms and Mobilization

23-27 June 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark

The summer school is funded by the Ph.D. programmes Art, Literature and Cultural Studies and ICT, Media, Communication and Journalism and by Centre for Sociological Studies Aarhus University (all Aarhus University). The event is part of a cultural studies summer school network with Warwick University, University of Southern Denmark, Södertörn University and Aarhus University as partners. The first event in 2013 was hosted by Warwick University

Organisers: Associate Professor, PhD, Britta Timm Knudsen, Associate Professor, PhD, Mads Krogh, Assistant Professor, PhD, Carsten Stage, Associate Professor, PhD, Anne Marit Waade

Partners: Warwick University, UK, University of Southern Denmark, DK, Södertörn University, SE, CESAU, DK, Copenhagen Business School, DK

Confirmed keynotes: Professor Georgina Born (Music and Anthropology, Oxford University), UK, Reader Tony D. Sampson (Digital Culture and Communications, University of East London), UK, Professor John Protevi (Philosophy and French Studies, Louisiana State  University), US, Senior Lecturer Luciana Parisi (Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths), UK

Lecturers / workshop organizers / discussants: Jenny Sundén, Södertörn University, Nathaniel Tkacz, Warwick University, Christian Borch, Copenhagen Business School, Representative from University of Southern Denmark, Anne Marit Waade, Aarhus University, Carsten Stage, Aarhus University, Mads Krogh, Aarhus University, Britta Timm Knudsen, Aarhus University, Christoffer Kølvraa, Aarhus University, Louise Fabian, Aarhus University, Camilla Møhring Reestorff, Aarhus University

ECTS: 5 ECTS

Time: June 23-27 2014

Room and Place: Aarhus University

Cost/ Policy: No cost fee, each participant covers travel & accommodation.

Max. number of participants: 30

Description:

The summer school wants to explore the role of affect, suggestive rhythms and contagion for the somatic mobilization of agents across a range of socio-cultural situations (e.g. protest events, dance halls, online forums, catastrophes), practises and processes (e.g. political mobilization and engagement, school bullying, youth loneliness, xenophobic/nationalist panics). In recent years an increasing interest in materiality, space, technology and embodiment has developed in the humanities and social sciences combined with an ‘affective turn’ (Clough, Massumi, Thrift, Seigworth and Gregg, Ahmed) to immaterial dimensions of these phenomena.

This has re-actualised early sociological theories about affective suggestion, contagion and imitation (e.g. Gustave Le Bon and Gabriel Tarde), which offer valuable insights to the analysis of a contemporary cultural landscape characterised by for instance viral/memetic phenomena, mediated/networked/rhythmically coordinated crowds, affective online communication and political modulation of citizen affects (Blackman, Borch, Gibbs, Sampson, Butler). During the summer school we wish to collectively explore the immaterial dimensions of the material social world and vice versa, discuss the potentialities, implications and risks of such analysis in an open interdisciplinary environment.

The event will attract PhD students from a range of academic fields (anthropology, geography, media, cultural studies, aesthetics, sociology, political science etc.) interested in, and doing research on, the affective turn, processes of imitation/suggestion/contagion, the rhythmically attuning mobilisation of bodies, and the im/material dimensions of culture and the social world.

Possible areas/topics:

  • – The affective dimensions of materiality, space, technology and things
  • – Aesthetics and affectivity, sensual design
  • – Mobilization within public and private spheres of action
  • – Viral communication, virality in the media, memes, social media
  • – The methodological challenges of analysing cultural materialities and immaterial processes
  • – Theoretical legacies to the ‘affective turn’ and new materialist orientations within the humanities and social sciences; early sociologies of contagion, suggestion and imitation
  • – Moral, media and financial panics
  • – Music culture, sound, dance and rhythm
  • – Industries of affect, affective consumption
  • – Tourism, black spot/dark tourism
  • – Artistic agency, idols and fandom
  • – Crowds, protest culture, social movements, (creative/eventful) activism, political events
  • – Depression, loneliness, bullying, affective exclusion
  • – Charity, empathy and sympathy
  • – Affect, emotion and power, war and affective modulation
  • – Xenophobia, nationalism, the strategic production of fear and hate
  • – Atmosphere, aura, prestige
  • – Sexuality, porn, love and care
  • – The affectivity of catastrophes
  • – Blasphemy, fanaticism and provocative politics

The Ph.D.-summer school will be based on keynote presentations, workshops and students’ own project presentations and organized feedback sessions.

Exam:

The examination will consist of three parts: 1. Full paper hand-in (deadline May 15); 2. Attending workshops and doing group assignments; 3. Paper presentation and discussion of papers.

Deadline for submission:

March 1 2014

Send an email to: Marianne Hoffmeister mho@adm.au.dk

Attach a description of your research topic and project (max. 300 words).

March 15: You will get to know if you participate, and you will be asked to confirm your participation.

Preparation for PhD students:

April 1: The organizers will form groups out of the participants (5 in all) and each group has to organize a slot of one hour each with a social and/or academic content (e.g. academic speed-dating, guided tours in Aarhus for strangers by strangers, exercises between the slots).

May 15: Deadline for submitting a full paper (10 pages)

Preparation for teachers:

March: Organizers must read the abstracts and form participants groups.

Medio May: The group of teachers will be responsible for 3-4 papers, that he/she has read carefully in advance in order to 1) place the paper within the theme of the summer school 2) to be a discussant of the paper and to give an open and constructive feedback at the summer school

About the summer school network (SSCT): The series aims at creating an international environment of constructive academic discussions in the field of cultural studies in order to strengthen this discipline in our respective academic communities and to develop the discipline of cultural studies according to actual developments and new theoretical paradigms. The series aims at improving teaching in cultural studies through a meticulous work on theoretical, methodological and empirical challenges. It is also our intention to build stronger research relations and exchange opportunities between the involved institutions and participants. Network coordinator: Carsten Stage (norcs@hum.au.dk).

CFP – Conjunctions -Transdisciplinary Journal of Cultural Participation

Conjunctions -Transdisciplinary Journal of Cultural Participation
Call for papers: Participatory Cultural Citizenship

Deadline: Papers must be submitted by February 28, 2014. Please visit www.conjunctions-tjcp.com to submit articles and for more information.

Conjunctions – Transdisciplinary Journal of Cultural Participation seeks to create a transdisciplinary forum for the investigation of user-generated production and user-driven cultural participation across a variety of social fields and participatory platforms. The overall focus is to explore the socially transformative and democratic potential of cultural participation processes, to qualify the academic understanding of what ‘cultural participation’ is and what itinvolves, and to discuss the complex relations created between user-generated material and established institutions. We invite submissions from a variety of disciplinary fields such as cultural studies, media studies, cultural geography, aesthetics, science and technology studies, health care, information science, sociology, anthropology, and gender studies.
In this first issue we seek papers that address questions of participatory cultural citizenship. For more than a decade the internet has been invested with high hopes for democratic empowerment of non-institutional voices (Jenkins2006, Fenton 2008, Bruns 2008, Gauntlett 2011, Lievrouw 2011), but also, over time, with concerns regarding the type of democratic interaction and the possibilities for citizens’ voices to be heard (Hess 2009, Couldry 2010). Simultaneously, everyday practices such as the found city, opportunistic tactics and spontaneous interventions have become celebrated in studies of urban space (Cuff and Sherman 2011, Stickels 2011, Lang Ho 2012, Chase, Crawford and Kaliski 2008). These processes emphasise collaborative practices and are also reflected in the rise of relational (Bourriaud 1998) and participatory art (Bishop 2012) in which the artist is co-producer of situations and dialogical art practices (Kester 2004, 2011). Accordingly, the recent participatory turn of contemporary cultural analysis and theory gives rise to a suggestion of the end of the passive audience/spectator, and the emergent of collaborative working processes and concepts such as participatory culture, DIY-culture, DIY urbanism, co-creation, produsage, creativeplace-appropriation, everyday creativity, participatory planning, social production and social entrepreneurship.
It is from such perspective that we invite papers that address the opportunities, limits and challenges of collective creation and citizen empowerment and evaluate the political potentials or impacts of cultural participation including non-professionalor ‘vernacular’ production.
Thematically papers can deal with a range of issues e.g.: the formation of social movements, creative online/offline activism, mobilization, social inclusion, artivism, urban planning, critical urban interventions, digital democracy and inclusion, participatory and political aesthetics, DIY urbanism and the concept ‘participatory culture’.
We seek papers that: 1) develop frameworks to design/enable as well as evaluate participatory processes; 2) explore participatory cultural processes as critical practices; 3) ask when and how participation is of value in terms of enabling active citizenship; 4) discuss the relation between bottom-up cultural initiatives and e.g. long-termplanning of spaces, cities and institutions; 5) ask to what extent cultural participation is threatened by institutional and/or economic strategies trying to profit from the work of users.
Camilla Møhring Reestorff
Department of Aesthetics and Communication
University of Aarhus
Jens Chr. Skous Vej 7, 1485/536
8000 Århus C – Denmark
Tlf: (+45) 871 63181 / (+45) 22783252

“Pursuing the Trivial”, new thematic section from Culture Unbound

New thematic section from Culture Unbound: “Pursuing the Trivial”

http://www.cultureunbound.ep.liu.se/current-volume.html

Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research has published a new thematic section entitled “Pursuing the Trivial”, edited by Roman Horak, Barbara Maly, Eva Schörgenhuber and Monika Seidl. It addresses the social significance of popular culture, past and present, and analyses how the seemingly trivial shape our daily lives and therefore our perception of the world. The articles cover areas such as popular culture of early 20th century, sports and racism, the philosophy of outdoor recreation, contemporary film and literature, and the everyday use of new technology.

Featured articles are:

  • Barbara Maly, Roman Horak, Eva Schörgenhuber & Monika Seidl, “Introduction: Pursuing the Trivial”
  • Steven Gerrard, “The Great British Music Hall: Its importance to British culture and ‘The Trivial’”
  • Roman Horak, “‘We Have Become Niggers!’: Josephine Baker as a Threat to Viennese Culture”
  • Yi Chen, “’Walking With’: A Rhythmanalysis of London’s East End”
  • Georg Drennig, “Taking a Hike and Hucking the Stout: The Troublesome Legacy of the Sublime in Outdoor Recreation”
  • Anna König, “A Stitch in Time: Changing Cultural Constructions of Craft and Mending”
  • Daniel Kilvington, “British Asians, Covert Racism and Exclusion in English Professional Football”
  • Sabine Harrer, “From Losing to Loss: Exploring the Expressive Capacities of Videogames Beyond Death as Failure”
  • Georg Spitaler, “Narrated Political Theory: Theorizing Pop Culture in Dietmar Dath’s Novel Für immer in Honig
  • Katharina Andres, “’Fashion’s Final Frontier’: The Correlation of Gender Roles and Fashion in Star Trek
  • Timo Kaerlein, “Playing with Personal Media: On an Epistemology of Ignorance”
  • Kati Voigt, “Becoming Trivial: The Book Trailer”

You can access all articles for free at: http://www.cultureunbound.ep.liu.se/v5/

Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural research is an open access e-journal that seeks to be a forum for contemporary, cutting edge cultural research from a wide range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary areas. We also welcome new article manuscripts in all areas of cultural research, as well as proposals for future theme sections.

Call for paper – appel à communication : ESSACHESS, volume 7, n°2(14)/2014

Call for Papers for volume 7, n° 2(14)/ 2014

FRENCH BELOW

How does Gender matter? Analyzing media discourses, media organizations and media practices

Guest editors:

Margreth LŰNENBORG (Director of the International Centre of Journalism, Free University of Berlin, Germany)

Using the concept of gender as a crosscutting principle underlying all aspects of social life (work, family, religion, migration, research, etc.) we intend to highlight the gender dimension of social life, a major phenomenon ignored for a long time (some researchers such as Marcel Mauss identified the division by gender as a fundamental matrix even if most sciences: from sociology to medicine were gender blind). The “liquidity of the modern society” (Bauman) also marked the concept of gender, floating “between social sex”, “gender relations” or “gender difference” understood as a socio-anthropological difference constructed and disseminated through standards and customs both practiced by and distributed via media. Entered fully into the social sciences (sociology and history in the first place), the gender is built conceptually in a wide range of feminist theories (universalists, differentialists, Marxists, radicals, deconstructionists, culturalists, queer) as a “differential valence” (Françoise Héritier) which provides / prospects on « the genesis and transmission of inequality and gender and sexual hierarchies » (I. Thery, 2010); gender is a relevant but not single dimension of social and cultural inequality as discussed in the concept of intersectionality.

The approach in terms of gender represents a paradigm shift in the Kuhnian sense, since it involves the radical transformation of social representations and collective values and norms, transformation correlated with the democratization of societies and promotion of the equality principle.

“Gender is a socially imposed division of the sexes. It is the product of social relations of sexuality. Kinship systems are based on marriage. They transform males and females in men and women”. (Gayle Rubin, 1975/1998).

In accordance with feminist methodology breaking with the epistemic ideal of “objectivity” to use the grounded theory rooted in the field, observation and data collection in situ, we are interested in papers referring to the analysis of the gendered structures and gendering practices of media images, media discourse and media practices.

In the theoretical tradition of Luce Irigaray articulations and modalities of communication distinguish male and female discourse. If speaking is never neutral to resume Luce Irigaray, we think we believe that the issues related to the use of discourse and media genres in the “feminine” media are as important as the presence / absence of women in mainstream media, especially in the news. The findings are that men and women do not use language in a similar way therefore demonstrates that language is gendered. The feminist theorists assert that it would be possible to create new forms of female thought, transforming the structures of the traditional way of thinking, because “it is not enough to change certain things in the horizon that defines human culture, but to change the horizon itself” (Luce Irigaray, 1992: 36). Yet these changes of horizon include both the change in the message, change of media production and obviously change the public.

Following Judith Butler’s concept of performativity of sex and gender (1990, 1993), we need to go beyond the essentialist concepts of “femininity” and “masculinity”. Thus distinctions between “male” and “female” writing, talking or reading are seen as obsolete. How can we then analyse distinct concepts of writing, journalistic production, public forms of articulation? How do we conceptualize the relationship of gendered media practices, media images and social constructions of gender?

Angela McRobbie (2009) refers to the term “Postfeminism” when critically discussing how originally feminist approaches to new gender relations have been instrumentally incorporated into popular culture. Thus we need to ask how to analyse the relationship of popular culture and changing gender orders.

Both Francophone and Anglophone approaches and concepts discussed in the field of gender studies refer to distinct theoretical framework, but offer complex opportunities for bridging academic cultures. We thus are interested in theoretical and empirical work going beyond well-established concepts of explanation and interpretation.

Analyses can be addressed (without excluding other possible approaches and angles) to:

i) Gender / women’s issues as topics of the mainstream media (such as the unemployment of women, female migration, female poverty, health etc.) and the journalistic treatment of these issues: scientific, sensationalist or trivialized in the print and online media;

– the manner of articulating the iconic and verbal text in the case of the representation of different sexes in the same referential area (sportswomen fragmented and connoted in the mode of appearance: emotion, aestheticism and sportsmen in the mode of being: prize, victory; in the field of politics the gendered conceptualization of power and success, the representation of political bodies etc.)

– the impact of the message on the public;

ii) the thematic and organizational modes of discourse (narrative, argumentative, descriptive) in the « feminine »  media (correlated or not to post-feminism, to backlash of feminism or to ordinary anti-feminism);

– the hybridization of genres and types of discourse by intertextuality / intersemioticity/ plurimodality.

iii) the gendered practices of and by digital media: modes of incorporation of media practices into professional habits and routines as well as into ‘private’ lifeworlds; the use of digital media in protest cultures (e.g. FEMEN).

The selected study corpus may be represented by all forms of media content including press, audio-visual media as well as online communication (electronic journals, personal blogs, professional blogs, etc.). Analyzing practices and discursive strategies of media in their constitutive relationship to gender structures in society we propose interdisciplinary reflections bringing together sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists, linguists and semioticians, researchers from information sciences, media and communication, interested gender images, actions and aspirations.

The field of gender studies has been a work in progress for more than forty years not only in Western countries, but also in non-European space. Gender studies develop complex theoretical perspectives, innovative methodologies evolved into practices (e.g. action research), and practices are used within and outside of academia. Our volume participates in the global movement of de-westernization of research and denaturalization of ‘gender hierarchy’ building a new reflexivity with the ultimate goal of emancipation

The analysis in the context of “situated knowledge” located at the intersection of political, economic and social ‘redistribution’ (absent from the public debate) and the policies of the specific claims of national or cultural minorities ‘recognition’ could show how identity minorisation goes hand in hand with the socio-economic discrimination in inertia of gender roles produced by the institutions of socialization

As we are now in a century characterized by “fast and furious developments in media products, technologies and institutions” (K. Ross, 2009) it becomes essential to re-examine in a critical perspective the concepts of media representation, media discourse, media practice bridging media culture and academy. We especially aim at bringing together the Anglophone research as well as the Francophone research in the field.

Important Deadlines

February 15, 2014: submission of the proposal in the form of an abstract of 400-500 words. The proposal must include a list of recent references;

– March 30, 2014: acceptance of the proposal;

July 15, 2014: full paper submission;

– September 30, 2014: full paper acceptance.

Papers should be between 6,000-10,000 words in length. Papers can be submitted in English or French. The abstracts should be in English and French, max. 200-250 words followed by 5 keywords. Please provide the full names, affiliations, and e-mail addresses of all authors, indicating the contact author. Papers, and any queries, should be sent to: essachess@gmail.com

Authors of the accepted papers will be notified by e-mail. The journal will be published in December 2014.

References

  • Bem, Sandra, 1993 The Lenses of Gender: Transforming the Debate on Sexual Inequalities,New Haven, Yale University Press.
  • Blandin, Claire & Méadel, Cécile (éditrices) 2009,  « La Cause des femmes » dossier thématique Le Temps des médias no 12, printemps-été.
  • Butler Judith, 1990, Gender Trouble : Feminism and the Subversion of Identity London Routledge (trad.fr. 2005, Trouble dans le genre: pour un féminisme de la subversion, Paris, La Découverte).
  • Butler, Judith, 1993 Bodies that Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex” , New York, Routledge Byerly Carolyn and Ross Karen, 2006 Women and Media. A Critical Introduction, Blackwell.
  • Chabaud-Rychter, Danielle, Descoutures, Virginie, Devreux, Anne-Marie,Varikas, Eleni, (sous la direction de), 2010, Sous les sciences sociales le genre. Relectures critique de Max Weber à Bruno Latour, Paris, La Découverte.
  • Carter Cynthia, Branston Gill, Stuart Allen (eds), 1998 News, Gender and Power, London, Routledge
  • De Bruin Marian and Ross Karen (eds), 2004, Gender and Newsroom Cultures, Hampton Press, pp. 81-104.
  • Dorlin, Elsa (sous la direction de), 2010, Sexe, Race, Classe Pour une épistémologie de la domination, Paris, PUF.
  • Gauntlett, David, 2008, Media, Gender and Identity, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Gill Rosalind, 2006, Gender and the Media, Cambridge, Polity Press.
  • Gill Rosalind and Scharff Christina, 2013, New Femininities. Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Gubin, Eliane; Jacques Catherine; Rochefort Florence; Studer Brigitte; Thébaud Françoise ; Zancarini-Fournel Michelle, 2004,  Le siècle des féminismes, Paris, Editions de l’Atelier.
  • Harding, Sandra, (dir.), 2004, The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Héritier, Françoise, 1996, Masculin, féminin. I. La pensée de la différence, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Hirata, Helena; Laborie, Françoise; Le Doaré, Hélène; Senotier, Danièle, 2000, Dictionnaire critique du féminisme, Paris, PUF.
  • Lazar, Michelle (ed.), 2005, Feminist Critical Discourse Analysis:Gender, Power and Ideology in Discourse, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Lünenborg, Margreth, Majer, Tanya (eds.), 2013 Gender Media Studies. Eine Einführung, Konstanz, UVK.
  • McRobbie, Angela, 2009 The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change, London, Sage.
  • Neveu, Eric, 2001, „Le genre du journalisme. Des ambivalences de la féminisation d’une profession”, Politix, 13, 51, 2000, pp. 179-212.
  • Ollivier, Michèle, Tremblay, Manon, 2000, Questionnements féministes et méthodologie de la recherche, Montréal, Harmattan.
  • «  Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States :Women and the Media- Advancing Gender Equality in decision-making in media organizations», 2013, Report realized by EIGE (European Institute for Gender Equality), Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union
  • Robinson, Gertrude, 2005, Gender, Journalism and Equity: Canadian, U.S and European Perspectives, Hampton Press, Communication Series, Cresskill, New Jersey.
  • Ross, Karen, 2009, Gendered Media. Women, Men and Identity Politics, Rowman & Littlefield Publications
  • Ross Karen, 2011, « Women and News. A long and winding road », Media, Culture and Society vol.33, no 8, 99, pp. 1148-1165.
  • Rubin, Gayle, 1975 (1998), « L’économie politique du sexe. Transactions sur les femmes et systèmes de sexe/genre », Cahiers d’études féministes, Paris, CEDREF no 7, pp. 3-81.
  • Roventa-Frumusani, Daniela, 2009, Concepts fondamentaux pour les études de genre, Paris, Editions des Archives Contemporaines.
  • Scott, Joan 1988) «Genre: une catégorie utile d’analyse historique », Cahiers du Grif: le genre de l’histoire, no 37-38, printemps, pp. 125-153.
  • Saint-Jean, Armande, 2000,  « L’apport des femmes au renouvellement des pratiques professionnelles : le cas des journalistes » in Recherches féministes vol 13, no 2, pp.77-93.
  • Thébaud, Françoise, 2003 « Histoire des femmes, histoire du genre et sexe du chercheur » in Jacqueline Laufer, Catherine Mary, Margaret Maruani (dir.) Le travail du genre. Les sciences sociales à l’épreuve des différences de sexe, Paris, La Découverte,/MAGE, pp.70-87.
  • Théry, Irène, 2007, La distinction de sexe. Une nouvelle approche de l’égalité, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Théry, Irène, 2010 « Le genre : identité des personnes ou modalité des relations sociales ? » in Revue française de pédagogie, 171, avril-mai-juin, pp. 103-117.
  • Van Zoonen, Liesbet, 2002, Feminist Media Studies, London, Sage Publications.

***

La dimension de genre dans les discours, organisations et pratiques médiatiques

Coordination du dossier :

Margreth LŰNENBORG (Directrice du Centre International du Journalisme, Université Libre, Berlin, Allemagne) et

Daniela ROVENTA-FRUMUSANI (Directrice du Département d’Anthropologie culturelle et Communication, Université de Bucarest, Roumanie)

En utilisant la notion de genre comme principe transversal sous-tendant toutes les composantes de la vie sociale : travail, famille, religion, migration, recherche, etc., nous nous proposons au travers de ce dossier de mettre en exergue la dimension sexuée de la vie sociale, aspect majeur longtemps ignoré (très peu de chercheurs parmi lesquels Marcel Mauss ont considéré la division par sexes comme matrice fondamentale alors que la plupart des sciences, de la sociologie à la médecine étaient gender blind). La « liquidité de la société moderne » (Bauman) a marqué aussi le concept de genre se situant entre « entre sexe social », « rapports sociaux de sexe » ou « différence de sexes » entendue comme différence socio-anthropologique construite et disséminée à travers les normes et les coutumes. Entré de plain-pied dans les sciences sociales (d’abord la sociologie et l’histoire), le genre s’édifie conceptuellement dans le vaste champ des théories féministes (universalistes, différentialistes, marxistes, radicales, déconstructionnistes, culturalistes, queer) comme « valence différentielle « (F. Héritier) qui fournit une / des perspective(s) sur « la genèse et la transmission des inégalités et hiérarchies sexuées et sexuelles» (I. Thery, 2010).

L’approche en termes de genre représente un changement paradigmatique dans le sens de T. Kuhn puisqu’elle implique la transformation radicale des représentations sociales, des valeurs et normes collectives, transformation connexe à la démocratisation des sociétés et à la promotion du principe d’égalité.

« Le genre est une division des sexes socialement imposée. Il est le produit des rapports sociaux de sexualité. Les systèmes de parenté reposent sur le mariage. Ils transforment donc des mâles et des femelles en « hommes » et en « femmes », chaque catégorie étant une moitié incomplète qui ne peut trouver sa plénitude que dans l’union avec l’autre. » (G. Rubin, 1998 : 48).

En accord avec la méthodologie féministe rompant avec la recherche « objective » pour utiliser la grounded theory enracinée dans le terrain – l’observation et le recueil de données in situ, ce dossier s’intéresse également à interroger toutes les expériences oubliées ou refoulées afin d’éclairer trois univers essentiels : l’économique, le politique et le scientifique dans leurs images et stéréotypes médiatiques.

Puisque « parler n’est jamais neutre » pour reprendre une citation de Luce Irigaray, on pourrait dire que les enjeux liés à l’usage de la langue et du discours dans les médias « au féminin » sont aussi importants que la présence / absence des femmes dans les mainstream / malestream media (surtout dans les news). Les théoriciennes féministes affirment qu’il serait possible de créer de nouvelles formes de pensée féminine en transformant les structures mêmes du système traditionnel de pensée, car « il ne suffit pas de changer telle ou telle chose dans l’horizon qui définit la culture humaine, mais bien de changer l’horizon lui-même » (L. Irigaray, 1992 : 36). Or, ce changement d’horizon comprend aussi bien le changement du message, le changement de la production médiatique et bien évidemment le changement du public .

En reprenant le concept de performativité du genre (J. Butler 1990, 1993) on réaffirme la nécessité d’aller au-delà des concepts essentialistes de « féminité » et de « masculinité ». Comment peut-on analyser les concepts d’écriture journalistique, d’articulation production / interprétation des messages journalistiques à travers le prisme du genre ? Quelle est la relation entre les images médiatiques, les pratiques journalistiques et la construction  sociale du genre ?

Angela McRobbie (2009) aborde de manière critique la modalité dans laquelle les approches originales du féminisme et surtout les « rapports sociaux de sexe » ont été incorporés et instrumentalisés dans la popular culture au seuil du troisième millénaire. Il nous semble légitime d’examiner les rapports qu’entretiennent la culture media et l’ordre du genre.

Les recherches anglophone et francophone conceptualisent de manière différente le champ des gender studies. Dans ce contexte, ce numéro de la revue Essachess – Journal for Communication Studies tente de rassembler ces cadres théoriques distincts afin d’offrir un tableau de l’actualité de la recherche sur le genre.

Les propositions pourront s’intéresser aux :

i) thématiques « féminines » de la presse généraliste (chômage des femmes, migration au féminin, pauvreté au féminin, santé, etc.) et leur approche (scientifique, sensationnaliste, banalisant, etc.) dans la presse papier et / ou en ligne ;

– la manière d’articuler  iconiquement et visuellement le texte dans le cas de la représentation des sexes différents dans la même zone référentielle (sportives « fragmentarisées » et connotées dans la logique du paraître – émotion, esthétisation –  et sportifs dans la logique de l’être – prix, victoire);

– l’impact du message sur les publics ;

ii) thématiques et modes d’organisation du discours (narrativité, argumentativité, description) dans les médias « au féminin » (médias corrélés ou non au post féminisme, au backlash du féminisme ou à l‘antiféminisme ordinaire) ;

– l’hybridation des genres et des modes de discours par intertextualité / intersémioticité / plurimodalité ;

iii) les pratiques genrées de la presse en ligne : la transformation des pratiques médiatiques par l’incorporation des nouvelles routines dans la vie professionnelle ainsi que dans la vie privée ; l’utilisation des moyens digitaux dans les cultures de la protestation (e.g. FEMEN).

Les corpus choisis pourraient être constitués des textes  de presse écrite et audio-visuelle ainsi que des cybertextes (journaux  électroniques, blogs professionnels, etc.).

En se focalisant sur l’analyse des pratiques et des stratégies discursives des medias conjugués d’une façon ou d’une autre à la problématique des femmes, ce dossier vise également à réunir des recherches interdisciplinaires menées par les chercheurs en sciences de l’information et de la communication avec les sociologues, les anthropologues, les sémioticiens, les linguistes, etc. qui s’intéressent aux femmes journalistes et aux images  et problématiques de genre.

Le domaine des gender studies est un work in progress depuis plus de quarante ans dans les pays de l’Europe Occidentale et de l’Est mais aussi dans l’espace non européen. Les études de genre développent des perspectives théoriques complexes, des méthodologies novatrices transformées en pratiques (recherche-action par exemple) utilisées et utilisables à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de l’Académie. Dans ce cadre, ce volume participera au mouvement global de désoccidentalisation de la recherche et de dénaturalisation de la « valence différentielle des sexes » (F. Héritier), construisant une nouvelle réflexivité dans le but ultime de l’émancipation d’une moitié de l’humanité.

L’analyse dans le cadre de la « connaissance située », à l’intersection des politiques de « redistribution » économique et sociale (absentes du débat public) et des politiques de la « reconnaissance » propres aux revendications des « minorités » pourrait mettre en évidence la manière dont la minorisation identitaire va de pair avec la discrimination socio-économique dans une inertie des rôles de genre produits par les instances de socialisation.

Au seuil du troisième millénaire caractérisé par des développements rapides et turbulents des produits, technologies et institutions médiatiques (K. Ross, 2009), il devient essentiel de réexaminer dans une perspective critique les concepts de représentation et de discours media, de pratique journalistique dans une connectivité reliant culture media et académie, recherche francophone et recherche anglophone.

Dates importantes :

– 15 février 2014 : envoi de la proposition d’article sous forme d’un résumé d’environ 2500-3500 signes espaces compris (comportant 5 mots clés et bibliographie sélective récente) ;

– 30 mars 2014 : notification des résultats ;

15 juillet 2014 : soumission intégrale de l’article;

– 30 septembre 2014 : acceptation définitive de l’article.

Les articles devront comprendre entre 20 000 et 25 000 signes espaces compris. Ils peuvent être soumis en français ou en anglais et doivent être accompagnés d`un résumé en français et en anglais (200-250 mots), de 5 mots clés, des noms, ainsi que des affiliations et adresses e-mail de tous les auteurs. Les articles et questions complémentaires doivent être adressés à : essachess@gmail.com

Les auteurs dont les articles auront été acceptés en seront avisés par e-mail. La revue sera publiée le 23 décembre 2014.

Références

  • Bem, Sandra, 1993 The Lenses of Gender: Transforming the Debate on Sexual Inequalities,New Haven, Yale University Press.
  • Blandin, Claire & Méadel, Cécile (éditrices) 2009,  « La Cause des femmes » dossier thématique Le Temps des médias no 12, printemps-été.
  • Butler Judith, 1990, Gender Trouble : Feminism and the Subversion of Identity London Routledge (trad.fr. 2005, Trouble dans le genre: pour un féminisme de la subversion, Paris, La Découverte).
  • Butler, Judith, 1993 Bodies that Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex” , New York, Routledge Byerly Carolyn and Ross Karen, 2006 Women and Media. A Critical Introduction, Blackwell.
  • Chabaud-Rychter, Danielle, Descoutures, Virginie, Devreux, Anne-Marie,Varikas, Eleni, (sous la direction de), 2010, Sous les sciences sociales le genre. Relectures critique de Max Weber à Bruno Latour, Paris, La Découverte.
  • Carter Cynthia, Branston Gill, Stuart Allen (eds), 1998 News, Gender and Power, London, Routledge
  • De Bruin Marian and Ross Karen (eds), 2004, Gender and Newsroom Cultures, Hampton Press, pp. 81-104.
  • Dorlin, Elsa (sous la direction de), 2010, Sexe, Race, Classe Pour une épistémologie de la domination, Paris, PUF.
  • Gauntlett, David, 2008, Media, Gender and Identity, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Gill Rosalind, 2006, Gender and the Media, Cambridge, Polity Press.
  • Gill Rosalind and Scharff Christina, 2013, New Femininities. Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Gubin, Eliane; Jacques Catherine; Rochefort Florence; Studer Brigitte; Thébaud Françoise ; Zancarini-Fournel Michelle, 2004,  Le siècle des féminismes, Paris, Editions de l’Atelier.
  • Harding, Sandra, (dir.), 2004, The Feminist Standpoint Theory Reader, New York, London, Routledge.
  • Héritier, Françoise, 1996, Masculin, féminin. I. La pensée de la différence, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Hirata, Helena; Laborie, Françoise; Le Doaré, Hélène; Senotier, Danièle, 2000, Dictionnaire critique du féminisme, Paris, PUF.
  • Lazar, Michelle (ed.), 2005, Feminist Critical Discourse Analysis:Gender, Power and Ideology in Discourse, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Lünenborg, Margreth, Majer, Tanya (eds.), 2013 Gender Media Studies. Eine Einführung, Konstanz, UVK.
  • McRobbie, Angela, 2009 The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change, London, Sage.
  • Neveu, Eric, 2001, „Le genre du journalisme. Des ambivalences de la féminisation d’une profession”, Politix, 13, 51, 2000, pp. 179-212.
  • Ollivier, Michèle, Tremblay, Manon, 2000, Questionnements féministes et méthodologie de la recherche, Montréal, Harmattan.
  • «  Review of the Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action in the EU Member States :Women and the Media- Advancing Gender Equality in decision-making in media organizations», 2013, Report realized by EIGE (European Institute for Gender Equality), Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union
  • Robinson, Gertrude, 2005, Gender, Journalism and Equity: Canadian, U.S and European Perspectives, Hampton Press, Communication Series, Cresskill, New Jersey.
  • Ross, Karen, 2009, Gendered Media. Women, Men and Identity Politics, Rowman & Littlefield Publications
  • Ross Karen, 2011, « Women and News. A long and winding road », Media, Culture and Society vol.33, no 8, 99, pp. 1148-1165.
  • Rubin, Gayle, 1975 (1998), « L’économie politique du sexe. Transactions sur les femmes et systèmes de sexe/genre », Cahiers d’études féministes, Paris, CEDREF no 7, pp. 3-81.
  • Roventa-Frumusani, Daniela, 2009, Concepts fondamentaux pour les études de genre, Paris, Editions des Archives Contemporaines.
  • Scott, Joan 1988) «Genre: une catégorie utile d’analyse historique », Cahiers du Grif: le genre de l’histoire, no 37-38, printemps, pp. 125-153.
  • Saint-Jean, Armande, 2000,  « L’apport des femmes au renouvellement des pratiques professionnelles : le cas des journalistes » in Recherches féministes vol 13, no 2, pp.77-93.
  • Thébaud, Françoise, 2003 « Histoire des femmes, histoire du genre et sexe du chercheur » in Jacqueline Laufer, Catherine Mary, Margaret Maruani (dir.) Le travail du genre. Les sciences sociales à l’épreuve des différences de sexe, Paris, La Découverte,/MAGE, pp.70-87.
  • Théry, Irène, 2007, La distinction de sexe. Une nouvelle approche de l’égalité, Paris, Odile Jacob.
  • Théry, Irène, 2010 « Le genre : identité des personnes ou modalité des relations sociales ? » in Revue française de pédagogie, 171, avril-mai-juin, pp. 103-117.
  • Van Zoonen, Liesbet, 2002, Feminist Media Studies, London, Sage Publications.

CFP – Les séries télévisées turques (diziler) – Call for papers – Turkish tv series (diziler)

ENGLISH BELOW

Appel à communication – Les séries télévisées turques (diziler) : production, représentations, réception en Méditerranée

Le développement et le succès des séries télévisées turques constitue un phénomène en Méditerranée depuis la fin des années 1990. Les genres se sont diversifiés, le secteur « fiction » des chaînes turques s’est enrichi de dizaines de nouveaux titres, le budget alloué aux séries a considérablement augmenté, et leurs caractéristiques techniques ainsi que les performances des acteurs ont gagné en qualité. D’abord essentiellement représentées par des formats de type « soap » tournés en studio, les séries turques ont commencé à être tournées dans la rue ou dans d’immenses décors en plein air fabriqués sur mesure. D’abord circonscrit à une audience nationale, le phénomène a maintenant conquis un public au niveau régional : les séries turques s’exportent désormais au Moyen-Orient, au Maghreb, dans les Balkans et en Asie centrale toujours demandeurs d’alternatives aux productions états-uniennes ou européennes devenues trop chères, ou aux telenovelas parfois éloignées de certaines références culturelles locales.

Ce colloque part d’un double constat : le manque de coordination des recherches sur les séries turques, engageant souvent des chercheurs isolés, et la pauvreté de la réflexion sur le sujet au sein de « TV studies ». C’est ce manque que ce colloque cherche à combler en se donnant pour but d’étudier le phénomène dans sa diversité. Il sera donc abordé selon trois axes : les conditions socio-économiques de production des séries télévisées turques, les représentations et les valeurs de la société turque qui semblent se dessiner à travers ces séries et, enfin, la réception de ces séries en Turquie et à l’étranger. Nous essaierons de croiser ces approches pour envisager ces séries comme production d’une culture populaire, à la fois œuvres de fiction et produits commerciaux, miroirs parfois déformants d’une société et vecteurs de transformation de cette même société, sans ignorer  les contraintes croisées des exigences du marché et de la censure.

Axe 1 : Une production de séries sous contraintes multiples : l’audience, le marché, le politique.

Axe 2 : L’imaginaire des séries turques : représentation, symboles et tabous.

Axe 3 : Questions de réception : les séries turques dans la société et dans leur environnement régional

Calendrier

>> Date limite pour l’envoi des propositions : 15 février 2014

Les propositions (environ 450 mots), en français ou en anglais, accompagnées d’une brève bio-bibliographie de l’auteur, doivent être déposées dans la rubrique « Déposer » de ce site web.

>> Réponse aux auteurs : fin mars 2014

Les textes des communications acceptées devront être rendus pour le début du colloque. Les communicants doivent prévoir au moins 3 à 4 minutes de projection vidéo. Ils devront s’occuper de la traduction, soit en fabriquant des sous-titres, soit par oral.

Lieu : Paris (à préciser)

Langues du colloque | Français et anglais

Pour plus d’information : tvseries-turkey@sciencesconf.org

Retrouvez l’intégralité de l’appel à communication sur le site du colloque : http://tvseries-turkey.sciencesconf.org/

———-

Call for papers – Turkish tv series (diziler): production, representations and reception in the Mediterranean

The development and success of Turkish television series have been a phenomenon in the region of the Mediterranean since the end of the 1990s. New genres have appeared. Entertainment divisions of  the Turkish channels have increased their budgets and purchased numerous new series. The quality of technical characteristics as well as acting performances have improved considerably. At the beginning, mostly soap operas, shot indoors, the Turkish series then began to go to location and construct elaborate outside decors. Limited originally to national audiences, the phenomen has now conquered a wider public in the region of the Mediterranean : Turkish series today are exported to the Middle East, North Africa, the Balkans and Central Asia, all eager to receive alternatives to American or European productions, having become too expensive, or to the telenovelas, often too foreign to local cultural references.

Two major observations have promoted this conference. First, research on Turkish series is too often the work of isolated scholars who would benefit from international exchange and coordination. In addition, television studies have neglected Turkish series and more attention must now be paid to these productions. In order to meet these needs, scholars are invited to study this multifaceted phenomenon, concentrating on three main angles: the socio-economic conditions of the production of Turkish television series, the representations and values of Turkish society conveyed through them and, finally, the reception of the series by both Turkish and foreign audiences. Hopefully, the conference will make it possible to confront different approaches in order to further the knowledge of these series as productions of popular culture, as works of fiction as well as commercial objects, as mirrors of society, even if sometimes deforming that society, as suggestions for changes, taking also into consideration market constraints and requirements and finally the issue of censorship.

Topic 1. The production of series subject to numerous constraints : audiences, markets, policies

Topic 2. The ‘imaginary’ inspired by Turkish series, representations, symbols and taboos:

Topic 3. Reception of the series in Turkish society and in their different regional environments:

Calendar

>> Deadline for proposals: 15 February 2014

Proposals (approximately 450 words) in French or English, with a brief bio-bibliography.

>> Responses will be sent to authors at the end of March 2014.

The chosen presentations must be submitted at the beginning of the conférence. Presenters are required to allot 3-4 minutes for the projection of video extracts, which must be translated either as subtitles or orally.

Venue: Paris (to be announced)

Languages: French and English

Contact and information: tvseries-turkey@sciencesconf.org

To find the call for papers, visit the conference website : http://tvseries-turkey.sciencesconf.

Appel à communication : les oeuvres plurielles de Martin Winckler

Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour

Centre de Recherche en Poétique et en Histoire Littéraire

Journée d’études du vendredi 21 mars 2014

Les œuvres plurielles de Martin Winckler

Appel à communication

Sur son site personnel, Martin Winckler se présente comme « médecin généraliste » et comme auteur d’un « certain nombre de livres ». Ses domaines d’activité en tant qu’écrivain sont

le roman (littérature générale et littérature policière), la nouvelle (policière et fantastique), l’autobiographie, les essais sur le soin et les métiers du soignant, la défense et l’illustration des cultures populaires (séries télévisées et bande dessinée, en particulier), la radio (chroniques, contes, théâtre radiophonique), les textes scientifiques (articles et ouvrages médicaux destinés aux professionnels ou au grand public, en particulier sur la contraception) ; la traduction (tous genres) ; les pamphlets et livres engagés (sur les droits des patients, en particulier).

Cet attrait pour une écriture protéiforme est aussi celle du petit Jérôme, cet « enfant qui n’aimait pas les livres » mais qui finit par s’y intéresser passionnément et devenir écrivain :

Plus tard, quand il sera grand, Jérôme écrira des histoires pour les enfants et des histoires pour les grands. Des histoires illustrées et des textes savants. Des romans d’aventure et des romans de mystère. Des récits de voyage et des poèmes. Des poèmes et des textes sur les voitures de course. Il les apportera à l’imprimerie de son père. Et tous les matins, un camion les emportera à la librairie de sa mère.

Et tous les jours, des gens entreront dans la librairie et achèteront des livres. Et certains achèteront les livres de Jérôme. Parce qu’ils y trouveront un secret. […]

« Les livres sont nos amis. »

La journée d’études se tourne ainsi vers les œuvres plurielles de Martin Winckler, saisies dans leur diversité et dans leurs échos.

Les communications s’intéresseront ainsi à ses différentes fictions : à ses récits autobiographiques, à ses romans et encore à ses contes et à ses nouvelles. Les propriétés génériques de ces textes, telles que leur écriture les met en œuvre, pourront ainsi être analysées ou comparées. L’appropriation des codes éditoriaux de la série du Poulpe dans le roman Touche pas à mes deux seins (Baleine, n°221) sera aussi un objet d’étude à retenir. De même, la spécificité et la variété des supports de publication de ces récits, du roman à la revue, en passant par les recueils, albums jeunesse et anthologies thématiques, pourront être examinées. Les échos intertextuels qui résonnent dans son œuvre narrative, entre ses propres textes, ou entre ses textes et d’autres écritures sont une autre occasion de souligner le jeu riche de l’hétérogène dans son dire : Martin Winckler dit lui-même devoir son nom de plume à l’œuvre de Georges Perec. De ce point de vue, un regard comparatiste pourra considérer l’adaptation cinématographique de La Maladie de Sachs (P.O.L., 1998 ; 1999 pour le film de Michel Deville). Cette prise en compte de la question de l’intermédialité de son œuvre invite encore à examiner les chroniques radiophoniques et les créations audio-visuelles auxquelles l’auteur a pris part. Il paraîtra opportun également de réfléchir sur les continuités et les ruptures de ses œuvres romanesques. Celles-ci pourront être envisagées d’un point de vue chronologique, depuis le début de ses publications jusqu’à aujourd’hui, avec En souvenir d’André (P.O.L., 2012). Les approches linguistique et stylistique de son écriture sont à prévoir. Il sera encore pertinent de s’arrêter, par exemple, sur la place de la femme, ou encore sur celle de la douleur et de la mort, dans ses différentes fictions : les études thématiques seront une autre piste de recherche.

Parce qu’elle y est justement un thème récurrent, la médecine sera un sujet à privilégier. Les communications pourront la considérer aussi bien dans des œuvres de fictions qu’à partir des essais sur le soin, des ouvrages pratiques, voire de l’activité de rédacteur de revue médicale qu’a remplie l’auteur, ou enfin des observations qu’il propose sur les séries télé : on pourra ainsi étudier, par exemple, la figure de Watson, le « biographe et médecin » de Sherlock, auquel Martin Winckler s’intéresse non seulement en tant que lecteur de Conan Doyle mais aussi en tant que téléspectateur de la série récente de la BBC et en tant qu’écrivain, en lui consacrant deux nouvelles à la fin des années 90 et en 2005. Cet attrait de l’auteur pour la figure du « médecin enquêteur » se retrouve dans son dernier essai, consacré à « Dr House » – L’esprit du shaman (Boréal, 2013), une série dont le personnage central tient à la fois de Sherlock et de Watson. Les approches transdisciplinaires seront appréciées, et la médecine pourra aussi être analysée comme un fil conducteur de l’ensemble des œuvres de Martin Winckler, lui qui affirmait dans son ouvrage de 2000 En soignant, en écrivant que « médecine et écriture vont de pair ». Elle est ainsi la source d’inspiration créatrice dans l’anthologie de nouvelles qu’il dirige en 2005, Noirs Scalpels, dans laquelle « il donne à (s)es camarades écrivains trois contraintes : un médecin, un instrument médical, un crime. » (Le Cahier de transmissions, « La Dernière Aventure »).

De manière plus générale, les séries télé, « miroirs de la vie », un autre domaine de réflexion de Martin Winckler, seront un centre d’intérêt de cette journée d’études pour des communications qui s’y intéresseront à partir des analyses de l’auteur. On se reportera aux ouvrages critiques sur les séries télé, écrits ou coordonnés par Winckler, pour en connaître la liste et l’analyse. Il sera particulièrement pertinent de souligner comment les publications de ce dernier ont été un élément précurseur pour toute analyse de l’art populaire qu’est la télévision, contribuant à sa reconnaissance :

à mes yeux les séries ont la même importance et la même qualité que les romans, les ouvrages de sciences humaines, le cinéma, le théâtre, les expositions et les conférences. Regarder une série n’est pas une activité exclusivement récréative, c’est une manière d’appréhender le monde.

Tel le lecteur de roman pour Pennac, le sériephile est alors crédité par Martin Winckler de certains « droits inaliénables », sur lesquels il pourra être intéressant de revenir.

Cette qualité d’innovation se retrouve aujourd’hui encore dans le site personnel de Martin Winckler, le « Winckler’s Webzine », ainsi que dans son blog pour « écrivantes, écrivants, lectrices et lecteurs », le « Chevalier des touches », qui pourraient faire l’objet d’une intervention lors de cette journée. Ce blog exemplifie une caractéristique commune aux œuvres et aux analyses plurielles de l’auteur : les séries télé, les chroniques radiophoniques, l’apprentissage de l’écriture – la maladie même – déclinent, dans leur forme, le rapport chronique entre l’hétérogène du fragment et le continu.

Les intervenants sont invités à soumettre un résumé de leur communication d’environ 2500 signes (espaces comprises), ainsi qu’une courte notice bio-bibliographique d’environ 1000 signes (espaces comprises) avant le 1er février à l’adresse suivante : journee.etudes.martin.winckler@univ-pau.fr. Les réponses seront données au plus tard le 15 février.

Remarque technique : les fichiers seront en .doc, .docx ou .odt et ainsi nommés : NOM-winckler.doc (le nom de famille ne devra pas comporter d’accent, de tréma ou de cédille).

La journée d’études aura lieu le vendredi 21 mars 2014 à l’Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, en lien avec la remise du Prix Heptaméron de la Nouvelle présidé par Martin Winckler. La publication des communications est envisagée.

N.B. : Le repas du vendredi midi des intervenants sera pris en charge, mais pas les frais de transport ni d’hébergement.

Les organisatrices :

Retrouvez cet appel et des informations complémentaires sur <http://crphl.univ-pau.fr/live/303-JE_2014_Winckler>

Black British Women’s Writing: Tracing the Tradition and New Directions

Black British Women’s Writing: Tracing the Tradition and New Directions
9 July 2014, University of Brighton, UK

Keynote Speaker: Bernardine Evaristo
Evening Readings by: Dorothea Smartt, Jay Bernard, Katy Massey and Sheree Mack
Following the first international expert meeting on Black British Women’s Writing (Brussels, 2013), this inaugural conference of the Black British Women’s Writing Network (BBWWN) will offer scholars and postgraduate students the chance to come together to debate some of the continuing preoccupations and new directions in this diverse and burgeoning field of study.
Abstracts of 250 words are invited for 20-minute papers as well as 60-minute panel proposals that engage with, but are not limited to, the following topics:
  • Theorizing Black British Women’s writing: The state of the field and usefulness of the terms. Debates in the existing anthologies/edited volumes/special issues and new critical approaches to both established and critically neglected writers.
  • Teaching Black British Women’s writing in the UK/US/the Caribbean/Europe and beyond.
  • ‘I am a Black woman…and I don’t bite’: Contemporary (self-) representations of Black British women.
  • Aesthetics and/vs. Politics: The politics of form and performance. Generic and thematic concerns.
  • Intersections: Racism, sexism and other forms of positioning.
  • The State of Feminism and Black (British) women’s stakes in this.
  • Conversations with Caribbean/African/African American/European/other writing.
  • Questions of Identity: National vs. diasporic identifications. Regional Identities. ‘Mixed-race’ identities. Gender and sexuality.
  • Memory and the Body: Sites of excavation/exploration.
  • Beyond Narratives of Unbelonging?: New imaginaries. ‘Post-racial’ narratives.
Please send abstracts as email attachments to:
Dr Vedrana Velickovic v.velickovic@brighton.ac.uk and Dr Sheree Mack sheree.mack@gmail.com by 1 February 2014.
Conference website:

David Hesmondhalgh, Why Music Matters, Wiley-Blackwell, August 2013

David Hesmondhalgh, Why Music Matters, Wiley-Blackwell, August 2013.

Description

In what ways might music enrich the lives of people and of societies? What prevents it from doing so? Why Music Matters explores the role of music in our lives, and investigates the social and political significance of music in modern societies.

  • First book of its kind to explore music through a variety of theories and approaches and unite these theories using one authoritative voice
  • Combines a broad yet theoretically sophisticated approach to music and society with real clarity and accessibility
  • A historically and sociologically informed understanding of music in relation to questions of social power and inequality
  • By drawing on both popular and academic talk about a range of musical forms and practices, readers will engage with a wide musical terrain and a wealth of case studies

Author Information

David Hesmondhalgh is Professor of Media and Music Industries at the University of Leeds. He is the author of The Cultural Industries, now in its third edition (2013) and co-author (with Sarah Baker) of a study of working life in three cultural industries, including music, Creative Labour (2011). He is also the editor or co-editor of various collections, including Western Music and its Others (with Georgina Born, 2000) and Popular Music Studies (with Keith Negus, 2002).

Contents

Chapter 1       Music as Intimate and Social, Private and Public

Chapter 2       Feeling and Flourishing

  • 2.1 Music, affect, emotion
  • 2.2 Emotions, narrative play and music
  • 2.3 Human flourishing, aesthetic experience and music
  • 2.4 Musical flourishing beyond contemplative cultivation
  • 2.5 Musical aesthetics and bodily experience: dancing
  • 2.6 Approaches to music and emotion in everyday life: contributions and limitations
  • 2.7 Problems of self-realisation in modern life and their relation to music
  • 2.8 Competitive individualism and status competition through music
  • 2.9 Review: music’s constrained enrichment of lives

Chapter 3       Love and Sex

  • 3.1 Sex and love and rock and roll
  • 3.2 Two approaches to music, sex and sexuality
  • 3.3 The pop-rock divide and rock’s sexual politics
  • 3.4 Post-war pop’s emotional resources
  • 3.5 Sex and love on the dance floor
  • 3.6 Critiques of countercultural sexual freedom
  • 3.7 Sex and love in punk, alternative rock and metal
  • 3.8 Sexuality in twenty first century pop
  • 3.9 Black music and racialised sexuality

Chapter 4       Sociability and Place

  • 4.1 Ways of being together: forms of publicness
  • 4.2 Celebrations of musical participation and their limitations
  • 4.3 That syncing feeling
  • 4.4 Ordinary sociability I: singing together
  • 4.5 Ordinary sociability II: dancing together
  • 4.6 Playing together: amateur musicians
  • 4.7 Theorising positive musical sociality
  • 4.8 Spectres of capitalist modernity revisited: class and inequality
  • 4.9 Uneven musical development
  • 4.10 Elements of thriving musical places
  • 4.11 Quality of working life of professional musicians

Chapter 5       Commonality and Cosmopolitanism

  • 5.1 Mediated commonality in modern societies
  • 5.2 Aesthetic experience and aspirations to commonality
  • 5.3 Redeeming aesthetic experience?
  • 5.4 Talk about music, what it tells us, and what it doesn’t
  • 5.5 Music, politics and publicness
  • 5.6 Communities of shared taste? Subcultures, scenes and fans
  • 5.7 Nations, ethnicity, cosmopolitanism
  • 5.8 Rock as cosmopolitanism?
  • 5.9 Complexities of music and nation
  • 5.10 Strange journeys: working-class and ethnic musics become national musics
  • 5.11 Sentimental citizenship
  • 5.12 Music, the nation and the popular
  • 5.13 Music of the African diaspora: life-affirming collectivity in decline?
  • 5.14 A critical defence of music

http://www.wiley.com

Imaginaires de la filiation. Héritage et mélancolie dans la littérature contemporaine des femmes, Evelyne Ledoux-Beaugrand

Evelyne Ledoux-Beaugrand, Imaginaires de la filiation. Héritage et mélancolie dans la littérature contemporaine des femmes, Montréal, Éditions XYZ, coll. « Théorie et Littérature », 2013, 320 p.

Cet essai présente une réflexion sur les legs du féminisme dans la littérature contemporaine des femmes. L’auteure y cerne le changement qui s’est opéré, à partir de 1990, dans la façon dont les auteures se sont mises à penser et à imaginer la filiation. Dans la production littéraire des deux décennies précédentes, les auteures avaient cherché à rompre avec la société patriarcale et s’étaient surtout intéressées à la sororité et aux relations selon un axe horizontal. Leurs héritières ont plutôt investi l’axe vertical de la généalogie et se sont penchées sur leurs relations avec leurs pères, leurs mères, leurs enfants et même avec leurs ancêtres éloignés. L’essai, qui analyse les points de rupture tout comme les lignes de continuité entre ces deux générations, s’appuie sur une réflexion sur la mélancolie en tant que posture créatrice. Son corpus est riche. Il se compose de récits et de romans français et québécois ainsi que d’écrits féministes issus de divers horizons, mais surtout du Québec, de la France et des États-Unis.

http://www.editionsxyz.com/catalogue/645.html

ISBN : 9782892618044

ISBN numérique : 9782892618051 / ePub: 9782892618068

TABLE DES MATIÈRES

Introduction : Génération héritière

  • Une politique mélancolique. Aux confluents des discours de la fin et des discours de l’héritage
  • La parole des filles : un mot sur le corpus et le parcours

Partie 1. De la sororité aux liens f(am)iliaux. Imaginaires de la filiation

Chapitre 1 : Le corps lesbien de la sororité

  • Retour vers la mère archaïque
  • Anatomie politique : en territoire du féminin
  • « Sa chair dit vrai »
  • « Quand nos lèvres se parlent » : Communi(qu)er

Chapitre 2 : La communauté disloquée. Une filiation mélancolique

  • Hériter, s’étranger. Vers une politique de la dislocation
  • Figures de l’altérité
  • « L’écriture comme un couteau »: ouvrir, creuser, exhiber
  • Esthétique de la blessure
  • Inappropriées et inappropriables. Les arts de faire avec
  • La tacticienne de Truismes
  • Affiliations mélancoliques
  • Spectres et justice

Partie 2. Des fantômes et des anges. La filiation en régime spectral

Chapitre 3 : La revenance du père.

  • Le livre sépulture
  • Porter le spectre paternel
  • L’énigme spectrale
  • Le père en reste, les restes du père
  • Asomie et spectralité
  • Symptomatologie de la hantise
  • Donner corps au fantôme du père. Métaphores de la grossesse et de l’avortement
  • D’un « remember me » à un « remembre-moi ». Une sépulture pour le père

Chapitre 4 : Histoires blessées. La voix des anonymes du passé

  • Nouvelles généalogies féministes
  • S’affilier aux (autres) minoritaires
  • Anges de l’histoire familiale : collecter les traces du passé
  • Textes patchwork
  • Dans l’ombre de l’Histoire
  • Libérer la voix des blessures : une contre-mémoire
  • (Re)connaître l’oubli : une justice in-finie

Partie 3. Filles et mères, filles (a)mères. La filiation en régime de deuil

Chapitre 5 : En huis clos maternel

  • Esquisser ou esquiver la mère? Portrait théorique du maternel
  • Le « huis clos maternel »
  • T(ro)uer la mère. Se faire une/la peau
  • Atteindre la mère
  • L’incestuel. Le deuil expulsé de la mère
  • La plainte à la mère : ouvrir la scène du juridique

Chapitre 6 : Écrire l’enfant sous le signe de la perte. Infanticide et loi maternelle

  • (Im)possible maternité
  • De l’appel à des voix de mères à l’énonciation de voix (a)mères
  • L’insaisissable descendance : écriture de la perte et logique mélancolique
  • Vers une loi maternelle : penser le pouvoir féminin/maternel
  • L’Autre maternel : l’infanticide sous le matricide
  • Ambivalence mélancolique: l’infanticide générateur de lien

Conclusion : Une mélancolie créatrice

  • Performativité et structure familiale : reprendre, retraverser, rejouer

Evelyne Ledoux-Beaugrand détient un doctorat en littératures de langue française de l’Université de Montréal. Elle s’intéresse aux théories et aux discours du féminisme, à la psychanalyse et à l’inscription de l’Histoire et de la mémoire d’événements traumatiques dans la littérature. Elle vit présentement en Belgique où elle mène des recherches postdoctorales sur la mémoire de la Shoah dans les littératures française et francophone depuis 1980.